Department Of Human Services Increases Transportation Checks At Child Care Agencies

Encourages All Responsible For Transporting Children To “Look Before You Lock”

Friday, June 16, 2017

Temperatures are heating up with the start of summer only days away. The Tennessee Department of Human Services Child Care Licensing Team is increasing its focus on transportation. TDHS Child Care Licensing program evaluators will conduct additional unannounced visits to child care agencies approved to transport children. These visits are conducted during hot summer months to ensure agencies are following transportation licensing rules intended to prevent children from being left on a vehicle unattended.

Current transportation rules include requirements for providers to have in-house transportation policies, appropriate supervision, and responsibilities for loading, unloading and tracking each child, specialized staff qualifications and more. Child care agencies must be approved by TDHS to provide transportation. TDHS considers violations of transportation licensing rules to be serious due to the risk of harm it could potentially cause to children. 

Aside from child care providers, TDHS strongly encourages parents and individuals responsible for transporting children to “Look Before You Lock,” and complete their own safety checks to keep children safe from heat related dangers. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a child’s body temperature can heat up three to five times faster than an adult. Further, on an 80-degree day, temperatures inside a vehicle can reach deadly levels in just 10 minutes. Even at an outside temperature of 60 degrees, the temperature inside a vehicle can reach 110 degrees. 

“Appropriate supervision is the key to keeping children safe during summer months,"  said TDHS Deputy Commissioner of Programs and Services Cherrell Campbell-Street. "Make sure children are accounted for, hydrated and not overly exerted while in high temperatures.” 

The A.C.T acronym can be used as a way to remember the risk of heatstroke and preventative measures:

Avoid Heatstroke
Never leave an infant or child alone in a vehicle, even if a window is cracked or if you’re parked in the shade  Look in the back seat every time you exit the car 

Create Reminders
Place an item such as your workbag or purse in the back seat next to the car seat, so that you’ll always check the back seat before you leave the car 
Have the child care agency or school call you if your child doesn’t show up 

Take Action
If you see a child alone in a car, call 911.
Know the warning signs of heatstroke, which include: red, hot, and moist or dry skin; no sweating; a strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse; nausea; confusion; or acting strangely.
If a child is in distress due to heat, get them out as quickly as possible and cool them off. 

Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 

For more tips on keeping children safe in and around vehicles visit: https://www.safercar.gov/parents/index.htm 

Anyone witnessing a child care transportation violation or other child care violation is urged to call the Child Care Complaint Hotline at 1-800-462-8261. Those not adhering to licensing rules can face a range of penalties including: probation, civil penalties, suspension, license denial or revocation. 

More information is available at www.tn.gov/humanservices or on kidcentraltn.com.

 



Alexander: To Reduce Billions In Health Care Waste, We Should Spend Less On Unnecessary Expenses

Senate health committee Chairman Lamar Alexander on Tuesday said that one way to reduce health care costs in America is to “stop spending money on unnecessary medical tests, services, procedures, or medications.”   Senator Alexander made his remarks on Tuesday at the Senate heath committee’s second in a series of hearings on how to reduce health care costs, ... (click for more)

Morning Pointe Presents Chronic Health Conditions And Joint Care Q&A on July 24

Morning Pointe will present a Caregiver Café Educational Q&A - Chronic Health Conditions & Joint Care in partnership with Parkridge Health System, on  July 24, from 6-7:30 p.m.   Officials said, "Join us as expert physicians answer your questions and offer advice to help keep you and your loved ones healthy." The title of the event is ... (click for more)

Man Shot And Killed On Arlington Avenue On Wednesday

A man was shot and killed on Wednesday afternoon on Arlington Avenue at the Bayberry Apartments. Chattanooga Police responded around 5 p.m. and found the victim. Officials said it appeared to be the result of a disorder between the suspect and the victim. The investigation is ongoing.   (click for more)

Firefighters Battle 2-Alarm Fire On Workman Road Tuesday Morning

Chattanooga firefighters were dispatched at 6:03 a.m. on Tuesday, to a commercial fire at 400 Workman Road. When the first firefighters arrived on the scene, flames were shooting through the roof and the request was immediately made for a second alarm response. The flames could be seen for miles as a total of 13 fire companies rushed to the scene. The large, two-story ... (click for more)

Am I Alone?

 Am I alone seems to be quite apt as I begin to form sentences, thoughts and concerns regarding the state of this country. I feel like I am alone trying, somehow, to justify Trump and understand why he is constantly in the middle of chaos.  Now coined as the Liar-in-Chief, Chief Foreign Affairs Coordinator acting for his pal Russian Dictator, Putin.  The silence ... (click for more)

Six Things We Can Do About Mass Shootings - And Response (3)

All politics aside, the recent shooting in Florida, and every other shooting in a public place, is a senseless and, possibly, preventable tragedy. It is absurd that we can’t gather in a free society without the fear of some nut job or terrorist using us as targets.   And then the cries of “do something!” from every quarter. But, other than the obvious attempt by agenda-pushers ... (click for more)