UTC Biennial Art Faculty Exhibition Opens Wednesday

Friday, August 18, 2017

The Cress Gallery of Art at UTC announces the UTC Department of Art Biennial Art Faculty Exhibition will have an opening public reception on Wednesday from 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the lobby of the UTC Fine Arts Center. 

Exhibition dates are Aug. 23-Sept. 15.  The gallery is open Monday-Friday from 9;30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 p.m.  It will be open on Monday, Sept. 4, from 1-4 p.m. as well. 

The exhibit is open to the public and admission is free. 

The Cress Gallery opens its academic season with its biennial exhibition featuring the visual manifestation of the professional research of full-time and adjunct faculty, and staff of the UTC Department of Art. 

Gallery visitors can expect the unexpected with works created in a broad range of media and materials from installation, video, and sound, to painting, sculpture, fiber, photography, graphic design, and more. 

Participating in this exhibition are, in alphabetical order, Molly Barnes, Christine Bespalec-Davis, Mark Bradley-Shoup, Ron Buffington, Mike Calway-Fagan, Matt Greenwell, Carrolann Haggard, Katie Hargrave, Pat Kelley, Phillip Andrew Lewis, Baggs McKelvey, Andrew O’Brien, Ray Padron, Ted Ross, Steven Sewell, Heath Schultz, Astri Snodgrass, Aggie Toppins, Gavin Townsend, and Christina Vogel. 

The Cress is located in the lobby of the UTC Fine Arts Center, 752 Vine St., corner of Vine and Palmetto Streets. 

Free parking is available after 5 p.m. weekdays and on Saturday and Sunday in any lot not marked “24 hour reserved”. Before 5 p.m. on weekdays, visitors will find metered or free street parking nearby the Fine Art Center, or park in the 5th Street Garage for a $4 fee and stroll across campus to the Fine Arts Center. 

For more information about the Cress and its programs visit www.cressgallery.org and on Facebook: Cress Gallery of Art or contact Ruth-Grover@utc.edu voice and text 304-9789 



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