Summer Deer Mortality Attributed To Common Virus

Friday, August 18, 2017

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) offices are receiving reports of dead deer in scattered areas of the state. The timing and details of the reports are all indicative of hemorrhagic disease (HD).

HD occurs at varying levels of severity each year in Tennessee’s deer herd. The catch-all term for this disease is hemorrhagic disease (HD), and epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) and bluetongue are the closely related viruses that fall under the umbrella of HD.

So far this year, reports are predominantly coming from East Tennessee, and based on the volume of reports it appears to be above average in severity. According to officials in Athens, Ga., at the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study (SCWDS), the outbreak being experienced appears to be a part of a larger multi-state outbreak involving several nearby states.

Reports to TWRA offices indicate mortality of deer in at least 20 counties with more expected as the season progresses. The last major outbreak of HD in Tennessee was in 2007 and involved virtually all of the state.

“So far the intensity of the outbreak seems to be localized,” said Roger Applegate, Wildlife Health Program Leader for TWRA. “We don’t anticipate this outbreak to rival that of 2007, but it is still early and we’re actively monitoring the situation.”

 HD is caused by a virus that is transmitted to deer from biting midges or “no-seeums.” It is not transmitted from deer to deer by contact. The virus causes fever, respiratory distress, and swelling of the neck or tongue. Not all deer exposed to the virus will die, but those that do usually do so within 5 to 10 days of exposure in or near water as they seek to cool their bodies from the fever. Incidence of HD usually peaks around mid-September and is usually done by mid-October with the onset of cold weather.

“Although some of the clinical symptoms are similar, it is important to not confuse HD with CWD (Chronic Wasting Disease),” said James Kelly, TWRA Deer Management Program Leader. “Unlike CWD, HD is a virus and deer can survive infection. It comes and goes at varying levels of severity much like the flu does for humans. CWD, on the other hand, is actually a much greater concern because the causative agents known as prions persist in the environment and in deer populations indefinitely.”

Fortunately, CWD has not been detected in Tennessee, and intensive surveillance will continue this fall by TWRA biologists and agency partners for this neurological and always fatal disease. For more information on CWD please visit cwd-info.org.


green|spaces Receives $50,000 Pay For Success Project Grant

green|spaces has been selected as a Pay for Success grant recipient from the Corporation for National and Community Service. "The $50,000 grant will help bring new services to residents in Chattanooga," officials said.  "The Pay for Success grant provides funding and technical assistance services to develop sustainable in-home projects that work to solve structural health ... (click for more)

green|spaces Initiates Straw Take Over Events For Skip The Straw Campaign

green|spaces is hosting three Straw Take Over events as a part of their “Skip the Straw” campaign, an effort to "the number of plastic straws that pollute the environment." The first Straw Take Over will be Oct. 19 at Bluegrass Grill from 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., followed by the second Straw Take Over on Oct. 25 at Niedlov's Breadworks from 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.  The Straw Take ... (click for more)

WWTA Releases Timetable That Would Have Ooltewah Sewage Treatment Plant In Operation By 2025; Public Meetings Set At Central High

The Hamilton County Water and Wastewater Treatment Authority has released a timetable that would have a new sewage treatment in Ooltewah in operation by 2025.   A request for a site at Mahan Gap Road goes before the Planning Commission at Nov. 12 at 1 p.m. It goes to the County Commission Zoning Committee on Dec. 12 and the full commission on Dec. 19.    ... (click for more)

Downtown Post Office Finally Getting Handicap Ramp

Chattanooga's Downtown Post Office, after some lawsuits and numerous complaints over the years, is finally getting a handicap ramp. Federal Judge Sandy Mattice said the complaints had increased in recent months and the General Services Administration agreed to fund the project at the historic building on Georgia Avenue. The judge said, "It's a beautiful building, but it's ... (click for more)

Too Many Questions

First it was about 2,000, then we were told it’s up to 4,000. We have no way of knowing who’s coming or what their purpose is. NBC and CNN assure us they are seeking sanctuary but how can we know? Neither Honduras or our subjective media in America have been honest with us in the past. So, how do we know why that many people are marching across Central America?   ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Who Do You Trust?

About this time last month a 25-year-old kid with a fresh degree in “public policy” left me a phone call hoping to get my views. Joda Thongnopnua is the Democratic candidate for the State House in District 30 and he is like a load of other erstwhile politicians in my experience who I’ve never heard of but “really want to meet me” … this with less than a month before they “really” ... (click for more)