A Better Ed Johnson Memorial

Monday, September 11, 2017
There has been a lot of discussion recently about honoring Ed Johnson who was viciously lynched on the Walnut Street bridge 111 years ago. I have no problem with a Memorial, however I believe the $200,000 could be used in many more effective ways to help the black community.

In reading some of the comments about Mr. Johnson one would be led to believe there were 10 lynchings every day in the old Confederacy. In fact according to research by the Tuskegee Institute in the 20th century 2806 blacks were lynched. This despicable act was not only committed on blacks but 1297 whites were lynched during this period. And contrary to popular belief, not all were committed in the south, but people in the west and north also were guilty of this heinous crime.

Make no mistake about it, no matter who and where they were lynched one death is way too many. However on this 16th anniversary of 9-11 we should remember that more people , 2977, were killed by Islamic Terrorists in a 2 hour period than black people were lynched during the 20th century. And more people 3061, have been murdered in Chicago since January 2012 than black people were lynched in the 20th century. The last lynching occurred in 1964 and was ironically a white person.

Mr. Johnson died a horrible death at the hands of a hateful mob. However, jumping out of the 100th floor of the WTC and bleeding out on the mean streets of Chicago are pretty tough ways to go too. Maybe we should honor Mr Johnson by dedicating ourselves to eliminating Muslim terrorism and the terrible carnage going on in Chicago.
 
Douglas Jones

 



Building Our Workforce With Tuition-Free College For All Tennessee Adults

As graduation season has come to a close, we celebrated the hard work and perseverance of so many who have achieved their dreams of earning a college degree. Their college success is not only important to their future lives - but also to the future of Tennessee.  Like many places across the country, Tennessee is facing a skilled workforce shortage. And while we know the ... (click for more)

Why Are Drugs So Expensive?

Diabetes seems to affect more people than any other chronic illness. It causes heart disease, liver and kidney failure and blindness. Eventually it is instrumental in the individuals death.  So why is there no cure?  Go ahead and call me a conspiracy theorist.  My fiancée recently started Trulicity. A once weekly self injection to help control blood sugar.  ... (click for more)

Former City Education Commissioner John P. Franklin Dies

John Porter Franklin, long a leading figure in Chattanooga city government, has died.  He was the city's first, elected black official, post Jim Crow laws, in 1971. Mr. Franklin's father, G.W. Franklin, was a pioneer funeral home director and John Franklin continued in that line. He was first an official in Franklin-Strickland Funeral Home, then he started John P. Franklin ... (click for more)

Pedestrian Struck And Killed In Cleveland Wednesday Morning

A pedestrian was struck and killed on Paul Huff Parkway early Wednesday morning. The incident happened around 2:30 a.m. More information will follow. (click for more)

Voice Of The Vols John Ward Dies

John Ward, the former “Voice of the Vols,” has died. Senator Lamar Alexander said, “When it came to UT sports, listening to John Ward was almost as good as watching the game. In fact, many Vol fans at many games brought their radios to make sure they could do both. John was a generous, courteous, enthusiastic ambassador for the University of Tennessee. He brought joy ... (click for more)

Belmont University's Mark Price Named Baylor School's Boys' Basketball Coach

Baylor School has named Belmont University's Mark Price as the boys' varsity basketball coach, following veteran basketball coach Austin Clark's announcement in April that he would be retiring after 36 years of coaching the Red Raiders. "I am very excited that Mark will be leading our boys' basketball program.  Throughout this process, we interviewed many individuals who ... (click for more)