Habitat For Humanity Taps Engineer And Developer To Join Its Board Of Directors

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Chattanooga elected Marcus Jones to its board of directors to support the organization’s ongoing effort to build affordable, energy-efficient homes and promote neighborhood development in the Greater Chattanooga area, officials said. 

Mr. Jones is an engineer and principle project manager for Tennessee Valley Authority. In addition, Mr. Jones is the president and CEO of Magnolia Developments, LLC. "He will apply his leadership, technical, and neighborhood development expertise to advance the mission of Habitat for Humanity," officials said.

A native of Mississippi, Mr. Jones earned a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from the University of Mississippi. He is a certified project management professional and a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. 

“We are thrilled to have Marcus join our board”, said David Butler, president and CEO of Habitat for Humanity of Greater Chattanooga Area. “His technology and industry insight coupled with business and leadership experience will be a valuable addition to the Habitat board.”

Other community leaders serving on the Habitat for Humanity Board of Directors include Catharine Bahner Daniels, Derrick DePriest, Randy Drummer, Jim Ford, Veronica Herrera, Mark Hite, Drew Hibbard, Beverly Johnson, Barbara Marter, Don McDowell, Linda Mines, James Moreland, Ron Morris, Craig Smith, David Wade, Jennifer Whitaker, Lebron Womack, and Dave Worland.
At work in Chattanooga since 1986, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Chattanooga Area is a faith based non-profit organization dedicated to transforming the Chattanooga area by working with financial partners and volunteers to build simple, decent and affordable homes for low income families. Habitat for Humanity of Greater Chattanooga’s corporate partners, volunteers, and families have built 271 homes providing more than 1,000 women, men, and children with the joy and security of Habitat homeownership. For more information about the ministry of Habitat for Humanity, visit www.habichatt.org.




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