Walls, A Multimedia Exhibition At The Jewish Cultural Center On Exhibit Through Oct. 27

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Walls, a multimedia exhibition of local, regional, and national artists is on view at the Jewish Cultural Center, 5461 North Terrace Road, now through Oct. 27.  There is no cost to view the exhibition. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays 9 a.m.-4 p.m., evenings and Sundays by appointment.  Schedule Gallery Talks by calling 423-493-0270.

The Jewish Cultural Center closes at various times during the Jewish High Holidays specifically Sept. 21, 22 and Oct. 5,6,12, and 13.

“A year ago I began thinking about the concept of walls stirred by the talk of a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico, and the conversations in Israel about who is able to go to the Kotel (Western Wall in Israel). Non-physical walls between people seem to be reemerging and include the wall dividing White Extremists and African American communities, and Russia’s political moving us towards a Cold War. And personally, speaking with my new neighbor about the Civil War walls that are now part of the woods between our properties led me to understand that we need to see how artists view these walls,” said Ann Treadwell, curator of the exhibition and program director for the Jewish Federation.

The selected pieces of art represent various thoughts about physical, mental, and spiritual walls.  A statement about each wall by the artist is exhibited with each piece of art. The exhibit includes art works by nine local artists including Judith Mogul, Miki Boni, Tom Farnum, Anna Carll, Howard Kaplan, Dana Shavin, and Charlotte Smith. A unique piece, “The Wall of Criminal Justice,” by deMichael of the H’Art Gallery, is a series of four smaller pieces. Regionally and nationally known artists include Harriet Goren , Cindy Lutz Kornet, Flora Rosefskym, and fiber artists Laurie Wohl and Rachel Kanter.

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