25,000 Volunteer On Feb. 25 To Plant 250,000 Trees In Tennessee

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Tennessee Environmental Council is promoting the need to plant 250,000 trees this Feb. 24, alongside 25,000 volunteers of all ages.  Tennessee’s growing population equates to more consumption and deforestation.  The Council’s Tennessee Tree Project was created to plant one million native trees across the state.  The organization has planted more than 360,000 trees since 2007 fulfilling its mission to educate and advocate for the conservation and improvement of Tennessee's environment, communities, and public health. 

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Department of Agriculture, and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency are collaborating with the Council on this statewide event.  “We could not host this successful event without our collaborative partners and sponsors," said John McFadden, CEO of Tennessee Environmental Council. "We are grateful for the hard work of our volunteers and distributors throughout all 95 counties." 

“Trees help protect our state’s most important natural resources,” said Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau. “They are vital for maintaining water quality, healthy air, flood prevention, wildlife habitat and healthy communities. 

In 50 years one tree provides $130,750 in total benefits including oxygen, air pollution control and stormwater drainage. 

The U.S. Forest Service found that more than two million acres of Tennessee’s native forests were cut and more than 500 thousand acres of forest were converted to other uses. 

Visit the 250K Tree Day website for details, registration, and updates.   

250K Tree Day is a project of Tennessee Environmental Council. Special thanks to sponsors and partners who make this historic event possible.


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