2nd Robert M. Hatcher Scholarship Winner Awarded To APSU Graduate Student Mackenzie Roeder

Friday, January 26, 2018
Mackenzie Roeder (far right) received the 2017 Robert M. Hatcher Memorial Scholarship. Mackenzie, a graduate student at Austin Peay, was presented the award at the January meeting of the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission meeting in Nashville. Pictured from left are Mr. Hatcher’s wife, Betty, TWRA Executive Director Ed Carter, the Hatchers’ daughter, Terri Hatcher Goodwin, the Hatchers’ son, Jerry, and TWRA Bird Conservation Coordinator, David Hanni. This marks the second year of the scholarship presented in Mr. Hatcher’s honor.
Mackenzie Roeder (far right) received the 2017 Robert M. Hatcher Memorial Scholarship. Mackenzie, a graduate student at Austin Peay, was presented the award at the January meeting of the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission meeting in Nashville. Pictured from left are Mr. Hatcher’s wife, Betty, TWRA Executive Director Ed Carter, the Hatchers’ daughter, Terri Hatcher Goodwin, the Hatchers’ son, Jerry, and TWRA Bird Conservation Coordinator, David Hanni. This marks the second year of the scholarship presented in Mr. Hatcher’s honor.

Mackenzie Roeder, a graduate student at Austin Peay State University, is the second recipient of the Robert M. Hatcher Memorial Scholarship. She was recognized and presented the award at the January meeting of the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission.

The $1,000 scholarship is named in honor of Bob Hatcher, who served the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency for 38 years, which included the Non-Game and Endangered Species Coordinator from 1987 until 2001. Members of the Hatcher family attended the presentation at the TFWC meeting held at the agency’s Region II Ray Bell Building.

Ms. Roeder is a graduate biology student at Austin Peay. She will be graduating early to begin Ph.D. position with SHARP (the Salmarch Habitat and Avian Research Project) at the University of Maine. Her plans for the future after completing her doctorate are to use her skills in molecular biology and evolutionary ecology to help conserve threatened and endangered birds and their habitats.

She is also the recipient of the Kautz-Thorwell Scholarship, the APSU graduate student research support grant, the Presidential Volunteer Service Lifetime Achievement Award (for dedicating more than 4,000 hours to volunteer conservation service), and the APSU Summa Cum Laude Academic Achievement award for maintaining a 4.0 GPA.

A native of a small town in the Catskill Mountains in New York, she inherited her love of birds from her great-grandmother. She has spent the past 10 years leading bird-watching hikes at wildlife refuges and caring for injured and orphaned birds at wildlife rehabilitation clinics. During her undergraduate years, she became interested in molecular biology and earned two bachelor’s degrees, one in forensic science and the other in biology. She assisted with the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project’s and later joined AmeriCorps and worked at Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge in Illinois. 

Mr. Hatcher initiated the state bald eagle recovery efforts in the early 1980s resulting in the release of 284 eagles over 22 years. He also was responsible for reintroducing osprey, river otters, endangered mussels and other species throughout Tennessee.

The establishment of the scholarship was announced in 2014 at the release of a 13-week old bald eaglet named “Hatcher’s Legacy” in his honor at a ceremony at Bells Bend Park near the Cumberland River, just outside of Nashville. The announcement came shortly before Mr. Hatcher’s death after a battle with cancer.

Ms. Roeder becomes the second Austin Peay graduate student in as many years to receive the scholarship award. Megan Hart was the inaugural winner in 2016.



Early Teal Season Opens Sept. 8 In Georgia

Early teal season is the first opportunity of the year for waterfowl hunters to get out in the field, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division. This year, early teal season is  Sept. 8-23,  with a daily limit of six teal.    “Scouting is very important during early teal season,” said State Waterfowl Biologist ... (click for more)

Squirrel Season Opens Aug. 15 In Georgia

Squirrel hunting provides the perfect opportunity to introduce someone to the sport of hunting, and the first opportunity of the year to start replenishing that meat in the freezer, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division. Unlike some big game hunts, the pursuit of bushytails often involves more action for energetic youth, providing ... (click for more)

NAACP Wants Answers On Snafu That Caused 43 Ballots Not To Be Counted In Recent Hamilton County Election

Officials of the NAACP said they have "grave concerns" about an election snafu in Hamilton County that left the ballots of 43 voters uncounted in the Aug. 2 election. The group said there has been little information given on the complex problem involving an earlier shift in voter lines. They have written a letter to Mark Goins, state election coordinator, and Kerry Steelman, ... (click for more)

Hearing Delay On Suit Brought By State Democrats To Keep Robin Smith Off Ballot

A hearing has been delayed on a lawsuit brought by the Tennessee Democratic Party seeking to keep Republican Robin Smith off the ballot in House District 26. Ms. Smith was the only candidate after longtime Rep. Gerald McCormick abruptly announced he was leaving his post to move to Nashville. Chancellor Jeff Atherton on Monday afternoon said he could not take the case until ... (click for more)

Make One Of The Proposed Surplus City Buildings Into A Local History Museum - And Response

The city of Chattanooga currently has no history center or museum. That is because several years ago it was conveyed to the public, in the blinking of an eye, that $9 million that had been raised mysteriously vanished for reasons unexplainable to this date. In the meantime, valuable artifacts and collections are sitting in cellars, basements and storage facilities instead of being ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: No Cell Phones Allowed

There was a time, not so long ago, when school-aged children would learn lessons from a prescribed text, such as a textbook. Today texting is far, far different and, as any of our teachers will tell us, cell phones have become the scourge of education. In almost every classroom, kids will silently text in the shadow of the desk in front of them rather than focus on the lesson. Yet ... (click for more)