Roy Exum: The Eye Of The Storm

Friday, February 2, 2018 - by Roy Exum
Roy Exum
Roy Exum

I’ve finally reached the point where my mind plays tricks on me. I’ll see somebody in a crowd and think, “I know that guy!” and it will bug me to the point I’ll say, “I am horribly sorry to ask … I’m Roy Exum and you look so familiar. Do we know one another?” And the guy will study my face and with a shake of his head reply, “Fella’ I’ve never laid my eyes on you in my life … I drive a big rig out of Chicago.”

Then there was another time. Some longtime friends I hadn’t seen in ages and I were sharing old memories over dinner at the Chattanoogan Hotel and this attractive lady noticed me staring at her several tables away. She smiled and tipped her head so here I went.

“I’m Roy Exum and I feel certain I have seen you before. I’d rather make a fool of myself and speak, rather than offend you by not acknowledging you. How do we know one another?”

The lady laughed, took my hand and said is a sultry sort of way … “You may have seen one of my movies … I’m Lauren Hutton.” (At the time her mother was in a North Georgia nursing home and I still have the picture of us looking sultry at each other.)

This is all to say I had another slap of déjà vu (French for “already seen") several days ago when I read a wonderful story about an old man who fed seagulls every Friday afternoon. It was one of those anonymous feel-good things your friends share on the Internet but I recalled it distinctly - I loved it when I first read it. So I sniffed around for almost two hours before I learned it was included in a book my favorite Christian author, Max Lucado, published in 2012.

The book, “The Eye of the Storm,” is Max at his best and, as the book’s jacket reveals …

* * *

“One day in the life of Christ.

“Call it a tapestry of turmoil: A noisy pictorial in which the golden threads of triumph knot against the black, frazzled strings of tragedy.

“Call it a symphony of emotions: A sunrise-to-sunset orchestration of extremes. One score is brassy with exuberance -- the next moans with sorrow.

“Whatever you call it -- call it real. Author Max Lucado calls it "the second most stressful day in the life of our Savior." Before the morning becomes evening, Jesus has reason to weep, then run, then shout, the curse, then praise, then doubt. Within a matter of moments his world is turned upside down.

“Sound familiar? The pink slip comes. The doctor calls. The divorce papers arrive. The check bounces. The life that had been calm is now chaotic. The world that had been serene is now stormy. Assailed by doubts. Pummeled by demands.

“If you've ever wondered if God in heaven can relate to you on earth, then read and re-read this pressure-packed day in the life of Christ. It is the only day, aside from the crucifixion, that all four gospels recorded. Lucado has interwoven their accounts in such a way that you will be assured that God knows how you feel.

“And you will be assured that within every torrent there is a calm center -- a place you can stand when your world gets windy. The Eye of the Storm.”

* * *

OLD ED & HIS BUCKET OF SHRIMP

(Written by Max Lucado)

It happened every Friday evening, almost without fail, when the sun resembled a giant orange and was starting to dip into the blue ocean.

Old Ed came strolling along the beach to his favorite pier.  Clutched in his bony hand was a bucket of shrimp. Ed walks out to the end of the pier, where it seems he almost has the world to himself. The glow of the sun is a golden bronze now.

Everybody's gone, except for a few joggers on the beach. Standing out on the end of the pier, Ed is alone with his thoughts...and his bucket of shrimp.

Before long, however, he is no longer alone. Up in the sky a thousand white dots come screeching and squawking, winging their way toward that lanky frame standing there on the end of the pier.

Before long, dozens of seagulls have enveloped him, their wings fluttering and flapping wildly. Ed stands there tossing shrimp to the hungry birds. As he does, if you listen closely, you can hear him say with a smile, “Thank you. Thank you.”

In a few short minutes the bucket is empty. But Ed doesn't leave. He stands there lost in thought, as though transported to another time and place.

When he finally turns around and begins to walk back toward the beach, a few of the birds hop along the pier with him until he gets to the stairs, and then they, too, fly away. And old Ed quietly makes his way down to the end of the beach and on home.

If you were sitting there on the pier with your fishing line in the water, Ed might seem like a funny old duck, as my dad used to say. Or, to onlookers, he's just another old codger, lost in his own weird world, feeding the seagulls with a bucket full of shrimp.

To the onlooker, rituals can look either very strange or very empty. They can seem altogether unimportant ....maybe even a lot of nonsense.

Old folks often do strange things, at least in the eyes of Boomers and Busters.  Most of them would probably write Old Ed off, down there in Florida ... That's too bad. They'd do well to know him better.

His full name:  Eddie Rickenbacker. He was a famous hero in World War I, and then he was in WWII. On one of his flying missions across the Pacific, he and his seven-member crew went down. Miraculously, all of the men survived, crawled out of their plane, and climbed into a life raft.

Captain Rickenbacker and his crew floated for days on the rough waters of the Pacific. They fought the sun. They fought sharks. Most of all, they fought hunger and thirst. By the eighth day their rations ran out. No food. No water. They were hundreds of miles from land and no one knew where they were or even if they were alive.

Every day across America millions wondered and prayed that Eddie Rickenbacker might somehow be found alive.

The men adrift needed a miracle. That afternoon they had a simple devotional service and prayed for a miracle.

They tried to nap. Eddie leaned back and pulled his military cap over his nose. Time dragged on. All he could hear was the slap of the waves against the raft...suddenly Eddie felt something land on the top of his cap. It was a seagull!

Old Ed would later describe how he sat perfectly still, planning his next move. With a flash of his hand and a squawk from the gull, he managed to grab it and wring its neck. He tore the feathers off, and he and his starving crew made a meal of it - a very slight meal for eight men. Then they used the intestines for bait. With it, they caught fish, which gave them food and more bait.....and the cycle continued. With that simple survival technique, they were able to endure the rigors of the sea until they were found and rescued after 24 days at sea.

Eddie Rickenbacker lived many years beyond that ordeal, but he never forgot the sacrifice of that first life-saving seagull... And he never stopped saying, Thank you. That's why almost every Friday night he would walk to the end of the pier with a bucket full of shrimp and a heart full of gratitude.

* * *

PS: Eddie Rickenbacker was the founder of Eastern Airlines. Before WWI he was race car driver. In WWI he was a pilot and became America's first ace. In WWII he was an instructor and military adviser, and he flew missions with the combat pilots. Eddie Rickenbacker is a true American hero. And now you know another story about the trials and sacrifices that brave men have endured for your freedom.

* * *

Any one of us who believes that he is a self-made man, or self-made woman, is horribly mistaken. Who was the wind beneath your wings? Have you taken your “bucket of shrimp” to illustrate your gratitude?

When you do, it will become one of the most meaningful days of your existence on earth. Savor it.

royexum@aol.com



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