2nd Annual Trivia Night And Silent Auction To Benefit Autism And Behavior Services

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Autism & Behavior Services is hosting its second annual Trivia Night and Silent Auction on Saturday, March 3, from 6-10 p.m. on the fourth floor of the Downtown Public Library (1001 Broad Street, Chattanooga, TN 37402).

Guests will be grouped together by tables to create teams. Teams will consist of six players per table who will compete against other teams in seven rounds of trivia for a chance to win a cash prize. Between rounds, guests will have the opportunity to bid on Silent Auction items.

Advance tickets for the event are $40 each or $240 per table. Tickets at the door are $45 each or $270 per table. Tickets include dinner catered by Taqueria Jalisco and 2 drink tickets. In addition, there will be a CASH bar serving wine, beer, sodas and water. Purchase advance tickets calling 423-664-0903.

ABS’ second annual Trivia Night & Silent Auction will help offset therapy costs which are not covered by health insurance and provide updated technology for parents and caregivers.

Officials said, "Imagine children struggling to communicate not only with their families but with their teachers and classmates. They get frustrated and fall behind. Often times, they may act out. Sadly, teachers and other key influencers in their lives are not aware of underlying issues.  Approximately 12% of school-age children have been diagnosed with Autism or a related behavior disorder. At Autism & Behavior Services (ABS), our mission is to empower individuals and families, impacted by autism and other developmental disabilities, through the evidence based principles of Applied Behavior Analysis to become valued, contributing members of their community." 



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