Richard Curry, 52, Dies After Falling From Fuel Dock At Norris Lake

Sunday, July 22, 2018

The identity of a man who died after he fell from a boat at the fuel dock of a Norris Lake marina is being released.

 

Richard Curry, 52, from Jamestown, Oh., died on Saturday at approximately 7:54 pm, after he fell into Norris Lake from a pontoon boat at the fuel dock of Shanghai Marina.

 

 

According to TWRA Boating Officer Jeff Roberson, a bass boat and a pontoon were involved in a minor property damage accident inside the “No Wake” zone at Shanghai Marina.  Following the accident, both boats headed towards the fuel dock and Mr. Curry fell between the pontoon boat he was onboard and the fuel dock as he attempted to step off.  Witnesses say that Mr. Curry fell into the water, went under and did not resurface.  Members of the Campbell Co. Rescue Squad recovered his body at approximately 8:31 p.m. in about 64 feet of water.

 

Witnesses also say that Mr. Curry had unfortunately just removed his lifejacket before the incident occurred.  Officials said, "A properly worn lifejacket is without a doubt the best safety practice for boaters or anyone around the water.  If someone who is wearing a lifejacket falls into the water and loses consciousness, it is much more likely that they will survive than someone who is not wearing one."

 

TWRA offers prayers and condolences for Mr. Curry’s family and those involved in the incident.  Following the incident, his body was been taken to LaFollette Medical Center and the incident is under investigation by TWRA.



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