Museum Center at Five Points Seeking Dirt Track Racing Artifacts

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

The Museum Center at Five Points is issuing a call for objects for the upcoming exhibition, In the Dirt: The Fast and Dirty World of Dirt Track Racing, opening on May 30, 2014. Items related to local tracks, racers and cars from the community can be included in this exhibition. The Museum will accept possible objects, on loan, for the exhibition beginning March 4, 2014.

The Museum Center will grab a ride on the history of racing by exhibiting the good ol’days of southern dirt track racing, focusing on the great racers, the best local tracks and answering the question of “what happened?” Racing on dirt tracks was a southern pastime for many generations with the knowledge of tracks, speeds and engine building passed on from one racing generation to the next. Quickly replaced by the newest, brightest and most expensive, the original sport of dirt track racing may soon be lost.

“We are looking for objects, such as brochures, advertisements, car parts with original racing numbers, photographs, equipment related to local race tracks, trophies, helmets and more, “ says Curator of Collections, Lisa Chastain. “We are also looking for stories, which are the heart and soul of any exhibition.” she says.

The Museum Center’s exhibition is in conjunction with the upcoming dirt track racing documentary by Ron and Debbie Moore. “We are thrilled to be working together on preserving the history of this quintessentially southern experience,” says Executive Director, Hassan Najjar.  “The premier of the documentary will be at the Museum on April 17 and we are looking to a packed house to see it.”

If you have items related to racing history and are interested in loaning to the exhibition, the Museum Center asks that you call Lisa Chastain at 423-339-5745 or email at lchastain@museumcenter.org.

The Museum Center at 5ive Points tells the story of the Ocoee region through compelling exhibitions and dynamic educational programming that promotes history, culture, and preservation. The Museum Store features arts, crafts, and books from select artists, craftsman, and authors from within a 200-mile radius. Hours are Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The museum is closed Sunday, Monday, and on select holidays. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and students, and free for children under 5. Members of the Museum receive free admission. Group rates are available and the Museum’s facilities can be rented year-round for weddings and special events.

For further information call 423-339-5745, or visit www.museumcenter.org.

 


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