Big Brush Creek Roots Music Festival And Camp Out To Be May 24-27

Monday, December 17, 2018

Big Brush Creek ROOTS Music Festival and Camp Out will be held May 24-27 on the 1,170 acre Big Brush Creek farm.

The venture producing Big Brush Creek ROOTS Music Festival and Camp Out started out with a three year plan, but the land is so big, their vision has turned into a perpetual development  plan. This boutique ROOTS music festival featuring one of the most diverse talent lineups, is sculpting land now for year two, three and beyond. The second “natural amphitheater” was just excavated now, even though it won’t be used until 2020.

“There’s room for 10 stages with no sound bleed many years from now,” said veteran Festival Producer Hal Davidson.

“Boutique” because it’s intimate and one-of-a-kind. This unique music festival and camp out is being carved out of the SE Tennessee countryside in one of the most beautiful parts of the state in the Sequatchie Valley, North of the town of Dunlap, about 55 minutes North of Chattanooga. Sparse traffic, access to major highways and a cooperative county government are contributing to this new venue becoming the place to getaway, said officials. Stompin’ in step with the state’s emphasis on festival tourism and roots music, Dunlap already presents three festivals downtown,
now welcoming a weekend long camp out music festival on one of its resident’s sprawling green spaces.

Cooperation between Big Brush Creek LLC, Festival Factory, LLC (the event’s long term producer) and the festival friendly Chamber of Commerce, EMS, and County Executive’s office- all endorsing the passage of a beer permit, has culminated in a Bud Light sponsorship from Budweiser of Chattanooga. Bledsoe Telephone Cooperative Fiber Optic is also a sponsor, connecting to the fiber optic lines already on the land. Wi-Fi is the goal and looks probable. More sponsors are on the way. 

Large scale excavation is manicuring the farm’s festival landscape, making large spaces for people to enjoy the freedom of this natural ponderosa. Big trucks, large earth moving equipment and experienced land designers have been at work for weeks.

“This is going to be one of the most magnificent festival properties anywhere,” Mr. Davidson proclaimed… and quipped, “This wonderful little camping event is the next jewel in the county’s crown of destination festival tourism. We’re having fun moving dirt!” 

This roots format is a mix of bluegrass, newgrass, jambands, reggae, funk country, jazz fusion, new country, and some rock music on one stage presenting 35 hours of live music over the entire Memorial Day weekend. Every band was selected on exactly what the lineup is and when they perform out of hundreds of entries.

“We intend to present the most incredibly diverse lineup in a natural, secluded place. The full talent lineup is booked except a couple loose ends,” Mr. Davidson said. 

Multi-genre performers from Tennessee and surrounding states booked are: Michael Cleveland & Flamekeeper, Unspoken Tradition, Dr. Bacon, Glade City Rounders, Trongone Band, Tennessee Mafia Jug Band, Lauren Morrow of Whiskey Gentry, Jordan Foster Band, Tennessee Jed, Time Sawyer, Cody McCarver performs his new gospel album on Sunday morning, Ashleigh Caudill, Urban Soil, High South,  Flux Capacitor, Plainview Vibes, Southern Proof, Matt Rogers, Joe Hott and the Short Mountain Boys, The Sofia Goodman Group, Faust N’ the Family Bargain, Natchez Tracers, Lazaris Pit and more coming.

“All of these bands were invited due to the level of their music, they’re all great,” Mr. Davidson said. 

"Part of the marketing emphasis is to keep prices very reasonable on everything,” said Mr. Davidson. Early Bird weekend passes are $49 for four days. Add the camping option for a Combo Pass, for a total of $79. “You can actually afford to bring your family or a group of friends without hocking your car,” Mr. Davidson said. “It’s the price of a campground with 25 free concerts.”

A 16 oz. Bud Light is $5. A bottle of water is $1. Bring an RV, it’s an extra $50 during the Early Bird period until Jan. 31. After that, it’s $60 extra to bring a RV. A festival hand tie dyed T-shirt (no two are the same) is $15 on the website, and includes shipping.

Merchandise vendors can take advantage of a spacious rental spaces starting at $250 for all four days, including worker passes and camping in the concert area. Sponsorships for companies and organizations are available. All rates are found on the website, bigbrushcreek.com.

Guests from major cities can take advantage of the festival bargains. “Your brain can enjoy the event more knowing it was cheap to be there,” said Mr. Davidson. “Where can you get away for the weekend with music for $79?”

Kids camp for free, under six free festival entry with an adult and over age 6 cost is $10 a day.

“People are increasingly fed up with high festival prices, so we’re proud to bring a great festival at low price,” Mr. Davidson said. 

Mr. Davidson is the promoter of Stompin 76 in Galax, Va,, the legendary bluegrass festival featuring the biggest names of our time, and a three-day ticket for just $12. Over 100,000 attended, it worked. See www.stompin76.com.

Big Brush Creek is not intended to be an attendance monster, but it does possess the same spirit of a country atmosphere, freedom, amplified music and good times for all, said officials. 

Festival Factory is a U.S. festival production company specializing in multi-day music/ camping festivals.


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