Rainy Days And Rainy Nights

Friday, February 1, 2019 - by Scott Fiedler
- photo by Getty Images

Sure, the sun’s out today—that strange, rarely seen ball of gas. It’s spent much of the past several months—nay, year—hiding behind rain clouds. That’s because, according to James Everett, senior manager of TVA’s River Forecast Center, we just experienced a record-breaking rainy year in 2018—and January has carried on with the trend.

“The year 2018 was the wettest year on record going back 130 years,” Mr.

Everett said. “We had a Valleywide average of 67 inches, eclipsing the prior 1973 record by two inches—we cruised right by it. We even had locations in the North Carolina mountains receive up to 100 inches of rain.”

The 2018 rains were different than the 1973 rains in that they were more consistent and spread out. “There was never a big flooding event, as there was in March of ’73,” he said.

Water levels in the Tennessee River system are high due to a very large amount of rain received in the second half of December, as well as a rainy January. “January rainfall is at 120 percent of normal, and runoff is 170 of normal,” Mr. Everett said. “The ground is so saturated from all the rain, it drives runoff levels up.”

To keep up with all that water, the river forecasters are using the tributaries to store flood waters, then releasing the water down through the Tennessee River to get ready for the next big event. “Spilling and sluicing at Cherokee, Douglas, Norris and Fontana was more common than normal this year—it doesn’t normally happen to that extent, but we had to release all that water that's been stored.”

Spilling and sluicing are happening on all the main stem river dams, from Fort Loudoun to Kentucky, and—because of the sheer volume of water moving through the system—river flows are quite strong, creating dangerous conditions below dams. “People need to heed warning signs, and know that conditions are especially hazardous for waders. We’ll look forward to spring, when we can start to fill up the tributaries and create better conditions for trout fisherman.”

Between now and then? Conditions look favorable for more rain. “We’re looking for rains in the three-inch range late next week,” Mr. Everett said. “The rainy trend looks like it might carry on.”


Tennessee's Free Hunting Day Set For Aug. 24

Informational Meeting On Wildlife Rabies Management In Tennessee And Georgia Set For Friday

Rare Orchids Get A Health Check


Tennessee residents are allowed to hunt without a license on Saturday, Aug. 24 which coincides with the opening day of squirrel season as well as being during the August private lands, archery ... (click for more)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Wildlife Services program is holding an informational meeting on the status of wildlife rabies and wildlife rabies management efforts in Tennessee and ... (click for more)

On Wednesday, a team of academics and state and federal biologists checked in on hundreds of rare white fringeless orchids that were transplanted to a remote location in the Bridgestone - Firestone ... (click for more)


Outdoors

Tennessee's Free Hunting Day Set For Aug. 24

Tennessee residents are allowed to hunt without a license on Saturday, Aug. 24 which coincides with the opening day of squirrel season as well as being during the August private lands, archery only deer season. Free Hunting Day is an event the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency annually provides in hopes of increasing interest in hunting. Squirrel hunting is one of Tennessee’s ... (click for more)

Informational Meeting On Wildlife Rabies Management In Tennessee And Georgia Set For Friday

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Wildlife Services program is holding an informational meeting on the status of wildlife rabies and wildlife rabies management efforts in Tennessee and Georgia on Friday, at 10 a.m. at The Colonnade (Catoosa County Civic Center), 264 Catoosa Circle, Ringgold. Wildlife biologists from Wildlife Services will provide updates on wildlife rabies ... (click for more)

Breaking News

Motorcyclist, 55, Killed In Collision With SUV On Tuesday Morning On Lee Highway

A motorcyclist was killed in a collision with an SUV on Lee Highway on Tuesday morning. At approximately 9:01 a.m., Chattanooga Police were notified of a serious traffic crash involving a motorcycle and a vehicle at 7500 Lee Highway. The CPD Traffic / DUI Unit responded to the scene. A GMC Acadia, driven by Gary A. Moore, 68, was traveling south on Lee Highway and merged ... (click for more)

Construction Set To Start Next Spring On $25 Million Chattanooga Airport Parking Deck; Terminal To Expand; Enplanements Continue To Increase

Terry Hart, president of the Chattanooga Airport, said at the August board meeting that it has been a good summer for the airport with enplanements in June increasing 12½ percent above last year and seven percent in July. For the first seven months of the year, enplanements are up 12 ½ percent with an increase of 2,500 arrivals and departures year-to-date over 2018. However, a leveling ... (click for more)

Opinion

What Does The White Privilege Presentation Have To Do With Education?

On Aug. 2, Hamilton County Schools held a professional development presented by motivational speaker, Robert Jackson. The PD was for the teachers in the Opportunity Zone, which includes the 12 lowest-performing schools in Hamilton County where 90 percent of the students are black. During the 90-minute presentation, there was a 15-20-minute segment concerning “White Privilege”. ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: 'White Privilege' Is A Myth

Several weeks ago, I must admit I had never heard of Patrick Hampton, an African American who has just joined a promising conservative think talk not-for-profit group known as Hamilton Flourishing. Headed by longtime executive and dream-maker Doug Daugherty, the group is in the perfect position to make a lasting impact on our all-inclusive community. Patrick Hampton made a huge ... (click for more)