Habitat For Humanity Makes Impact On Economy According To MTSU Study

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee has generated more than $107 million in economic activity last year. The nonprofit’s 45 affiliates have built more than 4,600 homes since its establishment in 1978, including 278 homes built by Habitat for Humanity of Greater Chattanooga Area. Habitat for Humanity also created the equivalent of 1,200 jobs statewide last year.

The Business and Economic Research Center in the Jones College of Business at MTSU partnered with Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee to produce the study. BERC compiled and analyzed data regarding Habitat-related expenditures in each of the four districts, including District 3, which is led by Habitat for Humanity of Greater Chattanooga Area.

“Habitat for Humanity’s vision is a world where everyone has a decent place to live and our local affiliates have worked for 41 years to make that reality for thousands of Tennesseans,” said Colleen Dudley, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee.

“But that positive impact goes beyond the families we serve. Habitat creates property taxpayers; we create jobs and we’re a leader in our industry,” said Ms. Dudley. “Our work affects entire communities and extends across the state and we were happy to partner with BERC to quantify our impact and tell that story.”

According to the study, almost 28,000 volunteers contributed to Habitat operations in 2017. The nonprofit also operates 33 ReStores across the state, including two located in the Greater Chattanooga Area, that encourage citizens to donate furniture, appliances and building materials to be sold. These ReStores accounted for $16 million in total business revenue and 226 jobs in 2018, according to the study.

Locally, Habitat has built 278 homes and provided homes for more than 1,000 men, women and children. Dozens more have benefitted from repairs and renovations provided by Habitat volunteers which provides the continued stability of a home.  With homes located across Chattanooga, Habitat not only makes a difference for residents but also for the neighborhoods in which their homes are built.

“Providing jobs and economic stimulation are just a couple examples of how Habitat for Humanity positively impacts the community in addition to providing homeownership,” said David Butler, president and CEO of Habitat for Humanity of Greater Chattanooga and board member of Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee. “We look forward to building on our success in providing strong and stable homes in the local community and contributing to the effectiveness of Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee.”

The full study can be found by visiting BERC’s website at https://mtsu.edu/berc/ and clicking on the appropriate link. 


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Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee has generated more than $107 million in economic activity last year. The nonprofit’s 45 affiliates have built more than 4,600 homes since its establishment in ... (click for more)


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