2 Area Sites Under Consideration For National Register Of Historic Places; Patton House At Coalmont "Gone"

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

The Tennessee State Review Board will meet to examine proposed nominations to the National Register of Historic Places on Wednesday, May 22, at 9 a.m. at Clover Bottom Mansion, 2941 Lebanon Pike, Nashville.

The Board will vote on four nominations:

  • Hardwick Farms, Bradley County
  • Charles L. Lawhon Cottage, Knox County
  • Ripley Fire Tower, Lauderdale County
  • Ebenezer Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Marion County

The Board will also look at removing a property from the National Register because it has lost the qualities for which it was listed:

  • John E.
    Patton House, Grundy County

Officials said the Patton House is now "gone."

Those nominations that are found to meet the criteria will be sent for final approval to the National Register of Historic Places in the Department of the Interior.

There will also be a presentation on the status of the State’s historic preservation plan revisions, which will be completed at the end of the year.  As part of our planning process, we are having an open house the rest of the day. The public is welcome to attend and comment on the plan.

The Tennessee State Review Board is composed of 13 members with backgrounds in American history, architecture, archaeology, or related fields.  It also includes members representing the public.  The National Register program was authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

The public is invited to attend the meeting. For additional information on the meeting, please contact Claudette Stager at (615) 770-1089 or at Claudette.stager@tn.gov.

It was written earlier of the John E. Patton house:

The John E. Patton House is located on hill that sits above Highway 56 on the outskirts of Coalmont. The one-and-a-half story Craftsman style house was built circa 1904 with round logs and concrete chinking. The house has variety of dormer and gable peaks that contains both straight edged and random cut shingles. On the main or east facade of the house is simple screened-in shed roof porch with rectangular posts. circular turret with conical shaped roof is located on the northeast corner of the porch. The house contains variety of windows including 1/1 sash, 20/1 sash, and small multipaned sash in the dormers. A small rear porch has turned porch posts. The interior of the house has been altered with the addition of 4' 8' panel boards. However, all of the original wood trim has been retained around the doorways, fireplaces, and staircase. The door surrounds are pilaster trim with bullseye cornerblocks. The stairway is partially enclosed with beaded wainscot siding. The upper portion of the enclosing wall is composed of ball and spindle frieze. Original fireplaces with variety of glazed tile surrounds remain in all the downstairs rooms. All fireplaces with the exception of the living room fireplace have wooden mantels with Ionic columns and applied decorative trim. The dining room fireplace is larger than the bedroom fireplaces and contains built-in mirror above the mantle shelf. The living room fireplace is of brick and stone. The brick ascends from the egg and dart mantel shelf in stepped pryamidal pattern with second egg and dart molding about halfway up the chimney.

There are two non-contributing outbuildings on the property, concrete block heating plant on the north side of the house and small frame shed at the rear of the house.

The John E. Patton House is nominated under criteria and for its significance in architecture and industry in Grundy County. The Craftsman Style house is good example of the vernacular adaption of revival log cabin. The house is also significant because of its association with John E. Patton, prominent person in the development of Coalmont. Coalmont was founded in 1903 as an open company town by the Sewanee Coal, Coke and Land Company. John E. Patton was the first postmaster of the town In 1908 the Sewanee Coal, Coke and Land Company was reorganized as the Sewanee Fuel and Iron Company with Patton as president In 1939 the coal company was once again reorganized with Patton as'president of the new company, the Coalmont Coal and Coke Company. In addition to his association with the coal companies, Patton was also director of the Coalmont Bank.

The John E. Patton House is important in both architecture and industry in Grundy County. The house is good representative example of the Craftsman style of architecture in Grundy County and is important for its association with prominent official of a coal company, the major industry in the county.


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