Lee Symphonic Band Performs In South Korea

Friday, June 14, 2019
The Symphonic Band performing at The Holy Spirit Church in Seoul.
The Symphonic Band performing at The Holy Spirit Church in Seoul.

The Lee University Symphonic Band has returned from a summer trip to South Korea. Thirty-five performers and the conductor, Professor of Music Dr. Mark Bailey, were welcomed to South Korea by Dr. Byeoung Soo Koh, the national overseer for the Church of God in South Korea.

“This was truly a once in a lifetime trip for the students in the Lee University Symphonic Band,” said Dr. Bailey. “This Band is the first Lee University church ministry group to visit South Korea in many years.  I am more convinced than ever that music, particularly instrumental music, is an incredibly powerful means of ministry across cultures.”

During the Symphonic Band’s 14-day tour, the students were able to explore the unique culture and lead multiple churches in worship. They visited a Korean professional baseball game at Munhak Baseball Stadium in Inchon; the Gyeongbokgung Palace, where the entire ensemble dressed in traditional Hanbok clothing; and toured the ancient palace where previous Korean dynasties lived and ruled. Marc Morris, Lee alumnus and regional superintendent for the Church of God in Austral Asia, hosted the Band during its stay.

“I have been privileged to be in South Korea to help facilitate the Lee University Symphonic Band’s trip,” said Dr. Morris. “To say the least, this group of incredibly talented and tender-hearted college students has been an encouragement to everyone who has heard their music, and bridges have been built.” 

The Symphonic Band was able to minister at five of the leading churches in Seoul, each representing several different denominations. The Band also performed at the Yongsan International School of Seoul, one of the top high school preparatory schools in Korea, and the Westminster Interdenominational Seminary.

“This trip was amazing!” said Emily Deinken, junior music education major. “Not only were we fully immersed in the Korean culture, but I also feel like I got to grow closer to the people in Symphonic Band. I feel like we made an impact in every church we visited.”

Under the direction of Dr. Bailey, the Lee University Symphonic Band has performed at churches across the country and at conferences such as the Christian Instrumentalists and Directors Association National Conference and the Atlanta Instrumental Expo Conference, the largest instrumental church music conference in America. It has also performed at numerous music festivals, appeared on television and radio, headlined important university events, and toured 17 foreign nations around the world.

For more information about the Lee University Symphonic Band, contact Dr. Bailey at mbailey@leeuniversity.edu.


Members of the Band in front of the Gyeongbokgung Palace
Members of the Band in front of the Gyeongbokgung Palace

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