Boehm Birth Defects Center Receives Grant From Walmart's National Giving Campaign

Thursday, December 20, 2012

The Water E. Boehm Birth Defects Center, Inc. is one of 15 nonprofit organizations across the country to receive a $10,000 grant from Walmart as part of its national holiday giving campaign.

On the eleventh day of its "12 Days of Giving" holiday campaign, Walmart awarded $150,000 to 15 nonprofits that are providing medical and emotional support to people in need in their local communities. One of the winning organizations, the Boehm Birth Defects Center, is a Chattanooga nonprofit whose mission is to enhance the lives of individuals born with birth defects of the brain and spinal column, such as hydrocephalus and spina bifida.  Founded in 1963, the Center continues to provide comprehensive, multi-disciplinary medical, financial, and psychosocial services for over 640 patients.

"Medical attention and emotional support can be difficult to obtain for those in need, yet both are essential to nurturing healthy futures year round and especially during the holiday season," said Sylvia Mathews Burwell, president of the Walmart Foundation. "Today, we're honored to support nonprofit organizations that are providing these basic services to people in their local communities."

Walmart's November call for submissions resulted in more than 21,677 nominations from Facebook users who submitted descriptions of each nonprofit's impact in its local community. Submissions were initially reviewed by Walmart associates from across the company and then a panel from the Walmart Foundation selected the winning organizations.

“We are overwhelmed and grateful for the outpouring of support from our community members who nominated us for this grant,” said Executive Director Elizabeth Myers.  

For more information about the Center, visit

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