Autistic Karate Student Ryan Rogers Makes History 4 Times

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Ryan Rogers, a karate student of Sensei Corey Green of Green's Karate, has made history four times.  Recently Mr. Rogers was officially diagnosed with ASD level 3 (Asbergers).  This process took over a year to complete and finalize the results.  Mr. Rogers found out on Oct. 31 and Roger told Sensei Green three days later. 

In 2012, Ryan became the "first documented person in history with autism to win a medal (bronze) in kata in the 18 to 34 year old novice non-handicap division at the U.S Karate Nationals (usankf.org)." 

Mr. Rogers won silver, in kumite, the next day, (same division) making him the "first person in history with autism to win a medal in kumite (sparring)."

Mr. Rogers also became the "first person in history with autism to become a U.S. National Karate Judge with the USA-N.K.F."  He is also the first Chattanoogan born person to do so.  Mr. Rogers was amongst the referees and judges at the 2012 Nationals including veteran referee, judge and coach,  Sensei Green. 

Sensei Green has been a judge and referee with the USA-N.K.F.  since 1998.   He is currently a referee "C" for kumite and a judge "D for kata for the USA-N.K.F.  Sensei Green, an Alaskan, continues to train under 8th degree black belt Sensei Katsutaka Tanaka.

Sensie Green authored a book recently titled "Finding Karate" and hired a man with autism, Ryan Netusil, to illustrate the cover.  The background for the cover is Moccasin Bend, located in Chattanooga where Sensei Green headquarters his karate school, Green's Karate.

Coach Jeff Kohn, chairman and team coach for the U.S. National Karate Team was also the recipient of the newly created 2012 U.S. Olympic Committee for being the "Paralmpyic Coach of The Year." 

Mr. Kohn says that Sensei Green and himself are pioneers in the field of teaching special needs karate.  Furthermore, they (Mr. Kohn and Sensei Green) specialize in the building up of students with special needs to train alongside and eventually compete (if they want to) at the highest levels of karate competition (USA-NKF) possible.  

Mr. Kohn and Sensei Green both strongly agree on the benefits of traditional karate including the; mental, physical, emotional and social benefits.

Mr. Green has several students with special needs that have made history over the years.

In 2006, Green taught the "first person in history with autism to qualify for the U.S. Karate Nationals in the non- handicap division."  His story was aired on CNN News. 

The boy featured on CNN, Brandon Earnshaw (diagnosed with moderate autism), now an adult, won gold in the 15 and younger handicap kata division in 2007 and the silver in the 2008 U.S. Karate Nationals in the same division. 

In 2007, Sensei Green taught another boy with autism (Asbergers) and he went with Mr. Earnshaw to the U.S. Karate Nationals.  The boy competed in the non-handicap division and was inspired by Mr. Earnshaw's story.

In 2010, Sensei Green taught the "first female in history with autism to qualify and compete in the U.S. Karate Nationals in the non-handicap division."

In 2012, Sensei Green taught the "first blind female in history to qualify and compete in the U.S. Karate Nationals in the non-handicap division." 

Katie Whipple won silver in the 18 - 34 year old women's beginner kata division at the U.S. Karate Nationals in the non handicap division.  

Ms. Whipple made history twice in one Nationals and trained only seven months to win silver. 

Mr. Whipple won gold in the 16 and older womens handicap division.  Two of the three students that Sensei Green taught to compete at the U.S. Karate Nationals in 2012 made history for a combined total of five times. 

In 2013, Mr. Rogers made history again by winning bronze in the 18-34 year old Mens Intermediate Kata division at the 2013 USA-N.K.F.  Nationals held in Greenville, South Carolina.  By winning this medal, he made history again and for the 4th time. 

In 7 U.S. National Karate Championship competitions,  (2006 - 2010 & 2012 - 2013), Sensei Green's Karate students have made history eight times and all were solely trained up by Sensei Green of Green's Karate.


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