Great Places To Stay In Tennessee

Friday, November 22, 2013 - by Tennessee Business Spotlight

Whether you want to visit the bright lights of a big city or unwind in the country, Tennessee has plenty of places to accommodate your traveling needs. Southerners are known for their hospitality, and Tennessee is certainly no exception. From The Peabody in Memphis to the General Morgan Inn in Greenville, check out these great places to stay.

Blackberry Farm

In 1939, Mrs. Florida Lasier of Chicago snagged her silk stockings on a wild blackberry bramble while exploring the idyllic Smoky Mountain foothills, and the name Blackberry Farm was born.

Thirty-six years later, the Beall family invested their hearts and souls in the same romantic site that has become their family home and lifelong passion. Today, one of America's most celebrated intimate luxury hotels beckons discerning guests who aspire to escape modern-day frenzy and slip into a Blackberry s... Read More

Carnegie Hotel

A Truly Exceptional Hotel Experience Awaits. Imagine personalized and attentive service, a range of outstanding amenities and elegant and sophisticated surroundings all in one package. At the Carnegie Hotel & Spa, an intimate boutique hotel in Johnson City, Tennessee, it’s all here and it’s all within your easy reach. With a superb, service-oriented staff, Old World ambiance, a full-service Spa and fantastic dining, the Carnegie Hotel & Spa offers a truly exceptional hotel experience.... Read More

Commodore Hotel and Cafe

Perfect for romantic getaways, outdoor adventures, or restorative retreats, this idyllic hideaway is conveniently located between Nashville and Memphis, and accessed by driving thru scenic, wide-open spaces. Michael & Kathy Dumont restored an all-but- forgotten 1939 hotel in the middle of Linden’s Arts and Historic District. Located along the original music highway between Nashville & Memphis, this historic hotel has housed famous musicians as well as aspiring artists. Some guests report se... Read More

General Morgan Inn

The General Morgan Inn is located in the heart of Historic Downtown Greeneville, TN. Originally built in 1884 as a railroad hotel called the Grand Central Hotel. After the turn of the century the hotel was purchased by the Brumley family and operated as the Hotel Brumley until the early 1980's. The hotel was closed and through an extensive community effort was renovated and reopened in 1996 as the General Morgan Inn. To honor our heritage the Inn's fine dining restaurant was named Brumley's whic... Read More

River Cottage Guest House

River Cottage is beginning it's third year of operation and has welcomed guests from across the United States and Europe. It is owned by Anthony and Mary Ann Gilchrist and their sons, Bob and Will. Mary Ann grew up next door at the Cherry Mansion, a Pre-Civil War home that was headquarters for Gen. Ulysses Grant prior to the Battle of Shiloh. She and Anthony built River Cottage in 1984 where they raised their two boys and a host of pets over the next 25 years. After the deaths of her parents, Ma... Read More

The Peabody Memphis

The Peabody Memphis opened in 1869 as a symbol of the South's rebirth. Named for philanthropist George Peabody, it quickly became the business and social hub of Memphis. In 1925, The Peabody was rebuilt at its present location on Union Avenue and continued to host presidents, celebrities, socialites and prominent business professionals. In the mid-1970s, The Peabody closed its doors as downtown Memphis experienced economic decline. But the "South's Grand Hotel" would not stay shuttered for long.... Read More

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