5th Lecture In Series Previews Another Gallery In New History Center Facility

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

The Chattanooga History Center will present the fifth lecture in a special preview series, Gallery Talks, at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 16. 

The series is examining each gallery visitors will encounter in the Center's new exhibit, scheduled to open late this year.Each preview stands as an independent program, and the April 16 presentation is "The High Road to Prosperity": Capital, Brains, and Muscle. CHC Executive Director and historian Dr. Daryl Black, will present the program, which will examine the reasons certain artifacts were chosen for the exhibit, and will include a visit to the space the gallery will occupy to gain an understanding of how it relates to the whole. 

The fee is $5 per person (CHC members free). Space is limited and pre-registration is required by Monday, April 15. Call 423 265-3247 to register.

The fifth gallery in the new exhibit explores Chattanooga's industrial history. Elements of the story include: John T. Wilder's early manufacturing plant; Adolph Och's publishing venture with The Chattanooga Times; Z.C. Patten's Chattanooga Medicine Company; the bold move to gain the rights to bottle Coca-Cola and the creative franchising that gave it world-wide distribution; and the development of the city as a textile giant.


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