Christians In Science Is Vision For Core Academy

Monday, April 22, 2013

Two Bryan College science professors will move to a new educational venture as they have organized Core Academy to encourage Christians to take up science as a vocation. 

Dr. Todd Wood, director of the Center for Origins Research and associate professor of science, and Dr. Roger Sanders, assistant director of CORE and associate professor of science, together with Stephanie Wood, the college’s archivist, have incorporated Core Academy of Science, filed for non-profit status, and assembled a board of educators and business people for the new venture.

"Our burden is for Christians and science together,” Dr. Wood said. “We have been concerned for a very long time with the hostility of Christians toward scientists, scientists toward Christians, and Christians toward other Christians. We want to help Christians better understand, appreciate and practice science.”

Their interest in reaching pre-college students grew as they found college generally was too late to address their concern. “In our roles as college professors we have found we generally get students too late. Their attitudes toward science and their career aspirations are already established."   

He pointed out that “Three hundred years ago, every scientist for the most part was a Christian; that’s not the case anymore.”

While Core Academy will be located at Bryan College for the coming year, the new educational ministry will receive no financial support from the college except for the gift of office space and utilities. 

Bryan President Dr. Stephen Livesay said, “CORE has been an important part of Bryan College for more than 20 years, so it is fitting that we should continue in this new relationship. The mission of Core Academy, to encourage Christians to become involved in the sciences, is a practical demonstration of believers taking purposeful steps to make a difference in today’s world to advance the kingdom of God.”

Core Academy will offer online classes through its website, initially targeting high school students. Two classes, general biology and introduction to origins, will be offered in the fall. Scientists who are practicing in their area of expertise will teach the classes. Classes will be designed to be compatible with a variety of textbooks rather than requiring students to buy a single text. 

At the same time, continuing education programs will be available for teachers. “In the future, we will be working with Bryan to design dual enrollment courses for Core Academy students,” Dr. Wood said.

As working scientists teach the classes, they will incorporate elements of their research into their lessons. 

“We’re not just retiring to become high school science teachers,” Dr. Wood said. “We’ll continue doing the research we have been working on. The big value in the Core Academy approach is that we will incorporate our current research into lessons. Right now, for example, we’re working on a grant proposal to fund an ecological project out west.”

For more information, visit the Core Academy website, write P.O. Box 1076, Dayton, TN  37321, or call 227-1106.


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