UT Gardens Expands To 3 Sites

Monday, April 29, 2013

The University of Tennessee Gardens have officially expanded to include the Discovery Gardens located at UT’s Plateau AgResearch and Education Center.

The announcement was made April 26 at the Cumberland County Master Gardeners’ Spring Flower and Garden Show at the county fairgrounds by UT Institute of Agriculture Chancellor Larry Arrington. Also in attendance were numerous Cumberland County Master Gardeners, including Mrs. Sara Senft, president of the group, and several UT officials including UT Gardens Director Susan Hamilton and elected officials including Crossville Mayor J. H. Graham and Cumberland County Mayor Kenneth Carey.

The UT Gardens are operated by the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture and can now be found in three locations:  the UTIA campus in Knoxville, the West Tennessee AgResearch and Education Center in Jackson, and the recently added location at the Plateau AgResearch and Education Center in Crossville. The original collection of UT Gardens is located on the UTIA campus in Knoxville, and in May is celebrating 30 years of horticultural education and research.  The second site of the UT Gardens is at the West Tennessee at the AgResearch and Education Center in Jackson.  It’s been a part of the UT Gardens system since 1989.

The Discovery Gardens at the Plateau AgResearch and Education Center were first planted in 2005 and is now the third and newest UT Gardens site.

The UT Gardens mission is to cultivate an appreciation of plants through horticultural displays, educational programs and research.  Every year more than 100,000 visitors travel to UT Gardens locations to attend one of the many special events and educational seminars or simply to explore the beautiful grounds. The gardens also serve as an outdoor laboratory where researchers evaluate the performance and landscape appeal of each plant.

Dr. Arrington said in making the announcement, “This addition to our system of gardens, which truly makes us a statewide system, came with a lot of help and cooperation and coordination.  I’d like to recognize the efforts of Walt Hitch, director of the Plateau AgResearch and Education Center, who has tirelessly worked with the Cumberland County Master Gardeners and Gregg Upchurch of UT Extension here in Cumberland County to make the Discovery Gardens the community resource it has become.  I’d also like to recognize the efforts of Dr. Sue Hamilton, director of the UT Gardens, whose vision of public horticulture as both an educational and research resource for the state is literally blooming.”

The UT Gardens system was recently named as the official Tennessee State Botanical Garden. 

Hamilton is elated about the statewide recognition. “Everyone associated with the gardens, from faculty, staff and student interns, to the many volunteers, Master Gardeners and donors, has worked hard to present an outstanding collection of public gardens. To be recognized as the state botanical garden is a great honor,” she said.

The gardens are also recognized as a certified Tennessee Arboretum.

All UT Gardens locations are open to the public and free to visit, although some events are fee based.  Plans for additional displays as well as additional locations are in the works. For more information about the UT Gardens, including upcoming events, visit http://utgardens.tennessee.edu or follow on Facebook.

The UT Institute of Agriculture provides instruction, research and public service through the UT College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, the UT College of Veterinary Medicine, UT AgResearch, including its system of 10 research and education centers, and UT Extension offices in every county in the state.



Tellico Hatchery Veteran's Event Is Successful

The TWRA, Tellico Hatchery held Project healing Waters Tellico River Fishing Event. Although the third year for a Project Healing Waters event, this was the first year that anglers fished the Tellico River. The event was previously held at Green Cove Pond. This year’s event was held in honor of the two fallen naval aviators, Lieutenant Patrick “Tank” Ruth and Lieutenant ... (click for more)

TWRA Regional Office Receives Pollinator Garden Grant

The TWRA Region 3 office has received a grant from the national Bayer Feed a Bee program to install a pollinator garden at its Crossville office. This national program has allotted $500,000 in grants to establish foraging plots for pollinators in all 50 states by the end of 2018. The Feed a Bee program has funded a total of 71 projects through the initiative to increase forage for ... (click for more)

3 People Shot Early Saturday Morning; 1 Is Killed; 2 Victims Are Known Gang Members

Ladarius Cross, 28, Terrance Careathers, 26, and a juvenile were shot early Saturday morning. Cross was killed.   Chattanooga Police responded to a motor vehicle crash at 5:16 a.m. in the 1400 block of Roanoke Avenue.   Upon arrival, Chattanooga Police Officers located the single vehicle crash with two people suffering for apparent gunshot wounds. The driver, ... (click for more)

Longest-Serving County Official Knowles Is First In Line To Sign Up For New Term

Bill Knowles is one of the longest-serving officials in Hamilton County history, and he's not through yet. County clerk since 1974, he was the first in line on Friday morning to pick up his petition for re-election. Then he beat everyone back with the completed form. Mr. Knowles said, "I ran in 1974 on a campaign of ending the long tag lines. We put in a tag by mail system ... (click for more)

Signal Mountain Should Be Problem Solvers Around The City

Re: Roy Exum’s “Stay, Signal Mountain, Stay”  Well this article is something to think about. I think the split could go either way, and Signal Mountain schools would still flourish, as they have done for the past several years. What I'm worried about is why Signal Mountain has not yet had the guts to go be problem solvers at Howard, or Tyner, or Central. Why do ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The School Board Bullies

When the good people of Signal Mountain join with their loved ones to give thanks for many, many blessings on this hallowed Thursday, you can bet the Hamilton County Department of Education will be on nary a list. For the past year a diligent advisory committee has studied the feasibility of forming its own school district and exactly one week prior to Thanksgiving, the misguided ... (click for more)