No Evidence To Link Nuclear Facilities To Health Of Surrounding People

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

There are good reasons not to trust claims made in the June 6 article “Environmental Group Says Study Shows Those Living Near Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Have Higher Mortality Rates.” 

After more than a half-century of continuous radiological monitoring and medical research, there is no evidence linking U.S. nuclear energy facilities to effects on the health of the public or workers. Claims that radioactivity from nuclear plants has caused cancer and higher mortality rates have been refuted by a United Nations scientific committee on radiation, the National Research Council, the American Cancer Society, and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The largest and most comprehensive study of potential health effects near nuclear energy facilities—by the National Cancer Institute—found no evidence of increased health risk from a wide range of cancers. In fact, a recent study co-authored by renowned NASA climate scientist James Hansen and Columbia University’s Earth Institute determined that nuclear energy has prevented at least 1.8 million deaths by displacing the use of fossil fuels to generate electricity. 

Regarding Joseph Mangano, the person hired to analyze the radiation data in Alabama,  states including New Jersey, Florida, California, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, and  Michigan have investigated similar claims of “potential” linkages and determined Mangano’s claims were unfounded.

The nuclear energy industry safely produces large amounts of electricity, and implements multi-layered protective programs that include strict monitoring for radiation within and around the facilities.  

Ralph Andersen
Sr. Director Radiation Safety & Environmental Protection
Nuclear Energy Institute
Washington,  D.C.


Where's The Money?

Don't worry about your condemned bleachers, East Ridge.   I'm certain all that money the Tennessee lottery makes for schools will have everything fixed ASAP.   Michael Burns (click for more)

Dangerous Tailgating

In the 1960's I worked in the CPD traffic division as a traffic accident investigator.  The leading causes of most accidents were driver not paying attention and following too close. I believe this is true today.  As I drive on the freeway or watch news video of freeway traffic, most drivers are guilty of following too close or tailgating.   The recommended ... (click for more)

Hutcheson Medical Center Attorney Says Buyer Willing To Pay Over $20 Million For Fort Oglethorpe Hospital

An attorney for financially-strapped Hutcheson Medical Center told a bankruptcy court judge in Rome, Ga., on Wednesday afternoon that a buyer is willing to pay over $20 million for all the assets of the Fort Oglethorpe hospital. Attorney Rob Williamson also said that six to eight purchasers are interested in the nursing home at the hospital's main campus. He and attorneys ... (click for more)

Hutcheson Medical Center Unsecured Creditors Committee Asks Trustee Be Appointed For Fort Oglethorpe Hospital; Asks Bankruptcy Not Be Dismissed

The Unsecured Creditors Committee of Hutcheson Medical Center is opposing a motion by U.S. Trustee Guy Gebhardt for a bankruptcy judge to dismiss the bankruptcy for the financially-ailing Fort Oglethorpe hospital.   Instead, the group is asking Judge Paul Bonapfel to appoint a trustee to oversee the Hutcheson finances. In a 16-page motion, the committee said if the bankruptcy ... (click for more)

Pugh, Smith Lead Sale Creek Past East Ridge, 3-0

If Sale Creek’s Bailey Pugh and Ariana Smith were a comedy act, Pugh would be Ed McMahan and Smith would play Johnny Carson. On the court, Pugh sets up Smith, who finishes things with killer punch lines. That was certainly the case Tuesday at East Ridge High School where the visiting Lady Panthers rolled over the Lady Pioneers, 3-0, with game scores of 25-16, 25-8 and ... (click for more)

Luthringer, Boyd Earn First Wins In Prep Cross Country Tuesday

There were a couple of first-time winners on Tuesday afternoon at Camp Jordan as the Chattanooga Cross Country League had its first official meet of the season. It was plenty hot and the humidity was relentless, so race officials decided to shorten the first race from the customary 5K distance to a two-mile test. The heat didn’t seem to bother the overall winners as Signal ... (click for more)