The Land Of Opportunity And Freedom

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

A small group of men met in Philadelphia during the hot summer days of 1787 and established (for the first time in history) the idea that we as individuals have the right and ability to determine our own destiny. It was generally accepted, for thousands of years previously, that man could not be free to make his own decisions, but that other more enlightened men should rule over him. This small group later became known as the Founding Fathers of our Republic. They understood that the rights of men do not come from government. They knew that men had rights before they had government. They believed that all men are created equal and are endowed by their creator with unalienable rights and that the purpose of government is to secure these rights. They agreed that if men are to live in freedom, the powers of government must be separated and limited.

Each man understood that he must preserve the sovereignty of his particular state. To accomplish this, only certain enumerated powers were delegated to the Republic. All powers not delegated to the central government were reserved to the states or to the people. To further insure each state’s sovereignty the Constitution provides that the Senate of the United States shall be composed of two senators from each state, chosen by the legislature thereof. 

The ideas incorporated into the new Republic worked so well that the U.S.A. became known worldwide as the land of opportunity and the land of freedom. Most of us have ancestors that were immigrants to this country. In the years between 1870 and 1900 there were 12.1 million people that left their native land to become Americans.

By 1910, our small upstart country, with only 6 percent of the earth’s land, had become one of the wealthiest nations on earth. There were more charitable donations from the U.S.A. than from all the other countries combined. In the short span of 100 years of freedom, there were more inventions to improve man’s standard of living than in all the previous thousands of years of recorded history. 

However, by 1910 there were several movements underway to change the Constitution and to go back to the old idea that man should not be free, but that other more enlightened men should rule over him. In 1913 several steps were taken to remove limitations so that more power could be given to government. The 16th amendment allowed (for the first time) the collection of taxes on an individual’s income, and the 17th amendment took away from the state legislatures the right to choose the states senators.     

The Federal Reserve Act was passed during Christmas vacation in 1913, which gave the government the mechanism by which to borrow unlimited amounts of money and to pass the debt payments on to the American people. 

Since 1913 there has been a steady erosion of individual rights and of states' rights, while each year more and more of our decisions are being made by the federal government. If this trend continues, the only possible result is a complete loss of individual freedom that the founders envisioned, loss of all states' rights, and the tyranny that almost always accompanies any government with unlimited powers. 

Although we have many serious problems in our country, we are fortunate in that we have been given the solution to most of these problems. If we are willing to study and learn the principles of freedom that were taught and established by that small group of men in Philadelphia, and if we will use our influence to spread their ideas of separation of powers and of limited powers, the chances that our children and grandchildren may live in freedom will be greatly increased. If we are not willing to do this, as Alexis de Tocqueville said, “We will get the kind of government that we deserve.”

Concerned Citizens for the Constitution
Mary Blosser, Founder


Roy Exum: Our Tubman Goat-Roping

Every spring there comes a bright day on the ranch when the straw-boss decrees a goat-roping should take place. What really happens is the veteran cowboys arm the greenhorns with some lariats late in the afternoon and take them to the pen that holds some Billy goats. This is before they get into bigger beasts -- horses and cattle – yet what appears to be easy most certainly is not. ... (click for more)

David Carroll: Touched By Alzheimer’s, A Thanksgiving Love Story

I want to share a Thanksgiving love story. Those smiles belong to Jim and Andi Erwin of Collegedale, now married 45 years. Jim is 68, Andi is 63.  I met them last summer, and fell in love immediately. Andi is a talker. Full of life, with energy to spare. Jim used to be a talker, an award-winning one. In his youth he was a teacher and pastor, very well-educated. Simply put, ... (click for more)

Grote Hall At UTC Campus Closed Due To Sinkhole

A sinkhole has prompted UTC officials to close off access to Grote Hall. Grote Hall employees have been told they do not need to report to work on Monday. Classes that are held in Grote Hall are called off for Monday. All other classes and campus activities are on for Monday. (click for more)

Bradley County Police Investigating Shooting; Victim Dies

The Bradley County Sheriff’s Office is investigating a shooting that occurred in the area of Georgetown Road. The sheriff's office said Sunday night that the victim had died. The victim's name has not yet been released.  A BCSO officer was waved down at the intersection of 25 th Street and Peerless Road by the driver of a vehicle who told the officer a gunshot victim ... (click for more)

Football Mocs Receive No. 8 Seed For FCS Playoffs

The hugs, high fives and first pumps by the Tennessee at Chattanooga football players late Sunday morning let everyone know in Moc Nation that the Blue and Gold had received a highy-coveted seed and would be hosting a second round NCAA FCS playoff game Dec 6 at Finley Stadium at 1 p.m. "When the television announcers called our name as the No.8 seed (out of eight ... (click for more)

Missouri Hangs On, Turns Back Tennessee, 29-21

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Missouri pin-pricked Joshua Dobbs’ bubble of invincibility Saturday night at Neyland Stadium. The nationally ranked Tigers drove a stake in Tennessee’s heart with Maty Mauk’s 73-yard touchdown pass to Jimmie Hunt in the fourth quarter, held Dobbs in check most of the game and beat the Vols, 29-21, before 95,821 fans on a chilly night on the banks of the Tennessee ... (click for more)