More Tennessee Papers Added to Chronicling America Project

Monday, September 23, 2013

The Tennessee State Library and Archives (TSLA) is proud to announce the addition of more than 1 million newspaper pages to the Chronicling America project, making historical newspapers from Greeneville, Jonesborough, Memphis, Sweetwater, and Winchester freely available on the Internet. These newspapers focus on the period from the 1850s to almost 1900.

In cooperation with the University of Tennessee, TSLA has already provided more than 120,000 pages of historical Tennessee newspapers to the site. In the previous phase of the project, TSLA focused its efforts on digitizing newspapers from the Civil War era, roughly 1850 through 1875.

Tennessee’s contribution to the online collection from that era represents 40-plus different titles published from big cities like Knoxville and Memphis as well as small towns such as Bolivar, Fayetteville, and Loudon. Each newspaper is displayed in full and researchers can search the online index to find pages containing information of interest.

To visit the list of Tennessee newspapers Chronicling America has to offer, please visit: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/?state=Tennesseeðnicity=&language=

The Chronicling America project has been underway since 2009, with most states participating. Each featured newspaper is displayed in full, and researchers can search the online index to find pages containing information of interest.

To read more about the project see:


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