Meeting Set to Examine Tennessee Nominations to National Register of Historic Places

Thursday, January 2, 2014
The State Review Board will meet on Thursday, January 16, 2014, to examine Tennessee’s proposed nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. Beginning at 10:30 a.m., the meeting will be held at the Ijams Nature Center, located at 2915 Island Home Avenue in Knoxville. 

The Board will vote on eight nominations from across the state. Those nominations that are found to meet the criteria will be sent for final approval to the National Register of Historic Places in the Department of the Interior.

The nominations are:

·        Bradley County: C.C. Card Auto Company Building

·        Davidson County: Tennessee Supreme Court Building

·        Knox County: Happy Holler Historic District

·        Knox County: Marble Industry of East Tennessee, ca. 1838-1960 - Mead Marble Quarry

·        Knox County: Marble Industry of East Tennessee, ca. 1838-1960 - Ross Marble Quarry

·        Sullivan County: Blountville Historic District

·        Sullivan County: Grand Guitar

·        Sullivan County: Martin-Dobyns House

The State Review Board is composed of 13 people with backgrounds in American history, architecture, archaeology, or related fields. It also includes members representing the public. The National Register program was authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

The public is invited to attend the meeting. For additional information, contact Claudette Stager with the Tennessee Historical Commission at (615) 532-1550, extension 105, or at Claudette.Stager@tn.gov.  

For more information about the National Register of Historic Places or the Tennessee Historical Commission, please visit the website at http://www.tn.gov/environment/history/.  




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