Anderson Would Muzzle Electorate - And Response (2)

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - by David Tulis

Chattanooga city council’s homosexual member offers bluff talk to the election commission as it considers a resident petition for his recall. 

Chris Anderson, through an attorney, argues that the motives of Tennessee citizens who live in his district are corrupt and tainted, and that approval of their petition to recall him is illegal and unconstitutional.

The letter by attorney and judicial candidate Stuart James traces what he says are trends in jurisprudence that disallow “discriminatory” purposes in the electorate. Assuming he is right in his analysis, let’s see where the trajectory he traces might end. 

While African nations are taking steps to criminalize sodomy, Mr. Anderson is part of a U.S. effort to redefine marriage by erecting a homosexual scaffolding against its outer walls. His disputed Chattanooga ordinance establishes a “domestic partnership” that is unlawful in Tennessee and outside the legal authority of a municipal corporation. He wants to unseat marriage, which is given special status in law and its participants social benefits because of its cultural and societal power and usefulness. 

Mr. Anderson and his homosexual coterie yearn for the day in which a new paradigm reigns and “discrimination” in favor of marriage is either a tort, a civil offense or a crime.
The people of Mr. Anderson’s district are dissatisfied with his representation on the city council, effectively the board of directors of a for-profit corporation in the municipal category. Their reasons vary, according to press reports. He is unresponsive to residents. He does not represents neighborhood interests disturbed by crime. He is overly focused on a gay rights agenda of which he made nary a mention in his campaign. He is avowedly homosexual, and homosexuals defy marriage and God’s law. 

Weary of democratic government
Mr. Anderson wants the commission to believe that because of an ascendency of homosexual rights in American law, it is possible for commission members to condemn the petition as an “abuse of the recall process.” Mr. Anderson faults the petition for stating no motive for the recall. Then he faults the petitioners for having motives upon which  it would be illegal for the commission to act. 

“The amended petition *** is also improper form because it is vague and ambiguous. Furthermore, the petition is a pretext for removing an officeholder for discriminatory purposes. The petition does not give any reason for removal.” 

Mr. Anderson, through his agent the attorney, complains that a petition is wrong-headed because elections are sufficient for his constituents. “If he is not doing a good job as the petition seemingly suggests[,] isn’t that what the regularly scheduled election is for? *** At the next election, if District 7 voters are unhappy with Councilman Anderson, they can vote him out of office just as they did with Mr. [Manny] Rico.” 

“Is this commission,” whines Mr. Anderson, “going to approve every petition filed for a recall just because an officeholder does a poor job in some voters’ minds? Is this commission going to approve petitions simply asking for a recall without specific reasoning?” He wants the panel to prejudge the public; he wants the agent to control the principal. “Is this commission going to approve a petition simply asking for a recall without a stated reason? If so, what are elections for and why can the will of the voters be so easily undone?”
Caretaker of the electorate, Mr. Anderson continues amplifying the point about the terrible burden voters face in having to go the polling precinct.

If the level of dissatisfaction with some voters causes them to ask for recall just because someone is doing a poor job, just how many recalls will this community have to face, and how many recalls with the voters have to endure? If the voters just want to have a question on the ballot asking voters to recall an official without  a reason, how many recalls will the citizens have to endure? 

He forgets throwing out politicians excites voters whereas regular elections are a bore. Behind the curtain in this argument is the idea that somehow recall elections are imposed top down. Rather, they are bottom-up. They bubble up from the people. They are more genuine than elections, which baffle the public because, whichever party they vote for, the government always gets in. 

Mr. Anderson’s pleading supposes that recalls are imposed on people by government; rather, they are imposed on government actors by the people. I get the feeling that Mr. Anderson is projecting a sort of political hypochondria upon the people, imagining an ailment where none exists.

The poison pill
Mr. Anderson’s letter pretends to have an interest in legitimate and illegimate (discriminatory) causes to not organize a recall. It purpose is to poison the public well of dissent by granting himself a high-minded pretext to ignore the entire lot of voters in his district. 

The recall petition, he grouses, “forces him to submit to a recall election ***simply because he is gay and for no other legitimate reason. The form of the petition strongly suggests an improper discriminatory motive.” He is being recalled “simply on *** sexual orientation” and urges the commission not to place “the state’s imprimatur on a recall that is motivated purely by discrimination against Mr. Anderson.” Allowing the petition, he says, validates “the true purpose” of the recall  (italics added). 

One distinction of first amendment jurisprudence is that federal courts are forbidden to take religious belief and to weigh and scrutinize content. 

If that belief is religious in nature, it is accorded protection. But Mr. Anderson insists that federal rulings require the election commission to dig into the content of voters’ grievances and to make distinctions as to legitimacy of belief. He requires the county election commission to weigh the content of religious and other opinion, to subject free Tennesseans to searching inquiry. 

Patronizing?
Mr. Anderson’s views of politics are like those of mainstream homosexuals. It is censorious. It touches on bigotry. It mocks anyone whose worldview has an intimacy with God. 

At least one signer of the petition, I am sure, worries about God’s hatred of homosexuality and thinks on His promises of forgiveness to those who repent; this one is to be shunned. Mr. Anderson would identify the ogres marshaling electoral hordes against him as being from this camp. 

The trajectory of his form of government is clear: Toward noble harassment of the commoner, a wheedling civil power pinching men's consciences for the good of all.

-- David Tulis is host of Nooganomics.com, a talk show on Copperhead 1240 AM that airs 1 to 3 p.m. weekdays and covers local economy and free markets. 


* * * 

Responding to: "While African nations are taking steps to criminalize sodomy"

The truth about those African nations taking steps to criminalize homosexuality, according to Mr. Tullis, is they have been heavily influenced by western evangelicals who've gone into many of those countries with big bucks paid to African government. Where gays are being beaten and even killed, and in some cases raped by their own family members to "make them straight." 

Maybe China would have been better for Africa after all? At least their goal was to rebuild the infrastructure the west and Europe has raped and ravished for centuries. China very much believe Africans are capable of running Africa and should be allowed to do just that. 

It's really a tragedy the way powerful nations often use religion around the world to justify brutal and inhumane acts. 

Brenda Manghane-Washington

* * *

Pardon me, Mrs. Brenda Manghane-Washington, but I didn't see where Mr. Tulis stated:
"according to Mr. Tullis, is they have been heavily influenced by western evangelicals who've gone into many of those countries with big bucks paid to African government. Where gays are being beaten and even killed, and in some cases raped by their own family members to "make them straight." "

And as far as your statement:
"Maybe China would have been better for Africa after all? At least their goal was to rebuild the infrastructure the west and Europe has raped and ravished for centuries. China very much believe Africans are capable of running Africa and should be allowed to do just that."

That is highly offensive considering that since the 1950s, since Chine invaded Tibet, a peaceful country. over a million peaceful Tibetans have been killed, and in fact, Chinese out-number Tibetans in their own country now. Also, they cannot practice their own religion, outlawed by the Chinese. If you lived in China now (and not in our great USA)... you couldn't even voice the opinion you just did.

And for my two cents, I don't care what Anderson is. If your sexuality defines you, you need a different definition, because as a citizen, many don't care what goes where. That is personal.

I don't care what you do. I only care where my money/tax dollars go.

Jen Freeland


Let Teachers Teach

Despite what you hear, everything about public education is not bad. I realize that there are concerns, especially when students from the United States are globally compared to other students from industrialized countries. But when you compare the United States to 50 years ago, there is definitely an improvement. The US Department of Education reports that the country has reached ... (click for more)

Protecting Water Strengthens American Economy

Water is crucial to the U.S. economy, specifically in areas like tourism, manufacturing, energy, recreation and agriculture.  In 2011, $30 billion was spent right here in the southeastern United States by both residents and non-residents of our region who enjoyed getting outdoors to fish, hunt, or simply watch wildlife in our rich and varied streams, forests and estuaries. ... (click for more)

Teen, 17, Charged With Aggravated Rape In Attack On 69-Year-Old North Chattanooga Runner

A 17-year-old has been charged with aggravated rape in connection with an attack on a 69-year-old runner in North Chattanooga on Monday morning. The teen was identified by Juvenile Court officials as Diontae Smartt. Authorities said he has given a confession. Smartt has a detention hearing Thursday at 12:30. The incident happened at approximately 7:30 a.m. ... (click for more)

Berke Implements New Pay Plan For Chattanooga Fire Department

Mayor Andy Berke joined the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) and leadership of the Chattanooga Fire Department to unveil the department’s new pay plan Wednesday afternoon. At a press conference at Fire Hall #1 on Main Street, Mayor Berke and IAFF Local 820 President Jack Thompson signed a memorandum of understanding which sets forth regular raises for fire ... (click for more)

East Hamilton Personnel Losses Boost Other 5-AAA Hoop Teams

CLEVELAND, Tenn. – East Hamilton’s loss has been solid gains for two other basketball teams in District 5-AAA and Ringgold, Ga. One of the Hurricanes’ top players, Kenny Bunton, left the program two days after Rodney English replaced fired Michael Stone and transferred to Walker Valley where he will play for coach Bob Williams’ Mustangs. “I took the job in March and two days ... (click for more)

John Shearer: Memories Of Watching 38 Baylor-McCallie Games

Back in the fall of 1971 when I was in the sixth grade at Bright School, I listened on the radio to the exciting football game between Baylor and McCallie schools, the first since the series had been discontinued after 1940. I was hoping to attend Baylor School as a student the next year, so I was quite excited that Baylor won, 9-7.  And the next year as a seventh-grader, ... (click for more)