Bat Watchers Wanted For DNR Summer Monitoring Project In Georgia

Friday, June 13, 2014

Biologists with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources are concerned that bat populations may be declining, especially since white-nose syndrome – a fast-spreading disease fatal to bats – was detected in the state last year.

Now, Georgians can help monitor bats in their area.

Have bats in a bat house, barn or other structure? Consider participating in the summer emergence counts project led by DNR’s Nongame Conservation Section.

“Emergence counts are one of the easiest ways to estimate bat numbers at summer roosts,” said wildlife biologist Trina Morris, who studies bats and coordinates monitoring for the Nongame Conservation Section, part of the DNR Wildlife Resources Division.

“You can invite your friends over to enjoy the show and take advantage of the natural pest control the bats are providing.”

Joining in is easy. Download instructions and a form to fill for each count at www.georgiawildlife.com/Bat-Roost-Monitoring. Participants are asked to complete the emergence counts for a roost twice during summer – although more counts are welcomed!

Ms. Morris hopes Georgians statewide will get involved. The project mirrors programs in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Emergence count surveys rate even more important because of the potential impact of white-nose syndrome, which has been documented in 25 states. Learn more about white-nose at www.georgiawildlife.com/WNS andwww.whitenosesyndrome.org.

If you don’t have a bat roost and want to build one, Bat Conservation International offers instructions at www.batcon.org. Kits and completed boxes built in Georgia are available at Habitat for Bats, www.habitatforbats.org.

Bats are picky so make sure you follow the instructions for building and placing a bat box to give you the best chance for attracting bats. Maybe someday soon you’ll be spending some pest-free summer evenings counting your bat colony!


Program Change For April Nature @ Noontime Program

A change has been made for the program for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s April Nature @ Noontime program. The new program will be presented on Native Bees: The Unknown Soldiers . It will be held on Thursday, at noon in the TWRA’s Region II Ray Bell Building located in the Ellington Agriculture Complex. Polly Rooker, of TWRA Region II will be presenter. There are ... (click for more)

TWRA To Be Part Of Nature Fest

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency will again be part of the Nature Fest held on  Tuesday, April 16 through Friday, April 19  at Pennebaker Hall on the Tennessee Tech University campus. The event highlights the wonderful, natural diversity found on the Cumberland Plateau through lectures, hikes and hands-on activities. The event is free and great for families.  ... (click for more)

Haslam Adds K-12 Funds In Budget Amendment

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam on Tuesday unveiled additions to the FY 2015-2016 budget that will be considered by the General Assembly in the coming weeks, including added funding for K-12. The governor last week met with school superintendents from the largest systems in the state over the issue of state funding for K-12. The next day, the Hamilton County Schools joined ... (click for more)

City Detective Who Was Arrested Twice In 4 Months Is Fired After Internal Affairs Investigation

A city detective who was arrested twice in four months has been fired by Police Chief Fred Fletcher. David Catchings had been charged with DUI last September and then with domestic assault at the end of the year. Police said, "After a complete review of both investigations – which included recommendations from Internal Affairs, the Administrative Review Committee and Officer ... (click for more)

Physicians Thank Their Patients On Doctor’s Day

March 30 has been set aside as National Doctors’ Day since 1933 as a time to recognize the contributions made by our physicians. While the recognition is appreciated, our greatest satisfaction comes from caring for our patients.  For 132 years, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Medical Society has been the physicians’ voice as we worked together to improve health of our community. ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Goodbye, Dr. Nassour

About 51 years ago, right after Jim Creel had graduated from the University of Texas and was in Guadalajara for medical school, he was surprised to find a complete stranger sitting on his battered and dusty Volkswagen. “He had seen my Longhorns sticker and was thrilled to find somebody else in Mexico who loved the University of Texas. “That’s when our friendship started and it ... (click for more)