Trae Vaughan Of Brock Insurance Agency Spotlighted In Tennessee Insuror Magazine

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The Tennessee Insuror magazine published an article on Brock Insurance Agency Partner Trae Vaughan in the Future Leaders Spotlight.

Mr. Vaughan has been a partner at BIA since 2012 and specializes in commercial insurance. Prior to joining BIA, Mr. Vaughan worked for five years as an underwriter with Travelers Insurance. Mr. Vaughan’s father has also been an independent agent for over 30 years in Columbus, Ms. 

Insurors of Tennessee is a trade association that was founded in 1893 and currently represents over 500 independent insurance agencies in Tennessee. Its members offer consumers a “Trusted Choice” of insurance companies, advocacy and professional advice for all of their insurance needs, said officials.

Daniel Smith, director of Communications at Insurors of Tennessee states, “We wanted to feature Trae because he is representative of the next generation of insurance agents. This is an ever-changing industry, and over the next 10 years we will see a major shift in the makeup of agents and agencies. We feel Trae will be one of the people at the forefront of that shift.”

BIA’s Director of Marketing Ramsey Brock states, “The company motto at Brock Insurance Agency is ‘the difference in insurance is the agent’ because without the right agent, whether it is a business or an individual everyone deserves someone who will guide them through any coverage challenge. Trae embodies this motto with his industry experience, character and knowledge to find the right solutions for his clients. Whether at the office, with clients or in the community, Trae leads by example while encouraging those around him.” 

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