Civil War History Program at Battlefield is April 18

Monday, March 30, 2015

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park invites the public to attend a 2-hour car caravan tour on Saturday, April 18 at 2 pm exploring the challenges faced by soldiers, civilians, and former enslaved people around the Chickamauga Battlefield at the end of the Civil War.

In April 1865, the major Confederate armies surrendered, and for a nation torn apart by four years of bloody strife, peace was finally at hand. However, reunion did not come easily.

Millions of soldiers faced a difficult transition back to civilian life, and the abolition of four million African Americans challenged long established social orders. That summer, The Liberator, an abolitionist newspaper, ominously cautioned, “The war is not ended as many fondly imagine.”

Participants will visit several sites throughout the battlefield and learn about how the veterans of Chickamauga and the people who lived here forged new lives at the end of the Civil War.

As a reminder, comfortable, supportive footwear, appropriate clothing for the weather and water are recommended for this program.

For more information about programs at Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, contact the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center at (706) 866-9241, the Lookout Mountain

Battlefield Visitor Center at (423) 821-7786, or visit the park’s website at www.nps.gov/chch.



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