USDA Forest Service Announces Ginseng Permit Process For 2018

Friday, July 6, 2018

USDA Forest Service officials announced that the period for applying for 2018 ginseng permits for the Cherokee National Forest will be Aug. 1–19. A random permit drawing will be held to determine who may purchase a ginseng harvesting permit. Ginseng collecting is limited because of concerns for overall reductions in wild ginseng population numbers throughout its natural range. 

For 2018 a maximum of 40 permits will be issued allowing 25 roots (approximately ¼ pound) per permit to be collected.

The 2018 Cherokee National Forest ginseng permitting and harvesting process will be as follows: 

 

The 2018 ginseng collection season will be from Sept. 16-30. This two week period will be the only time that ginseng can be legally collected in the Cherokee National Forest by valid permit holders. 

 

The Forest Service will issue a total of 40 permits, each with a maximum limit of 25 roots. A drawing will be held to determine the 40 permittees. 20 permits will be issued for the northern half of the Forest (Watauga & Unaka Ranger Districts) and 20 permits will be issued for the southern half of the Forest (Tellico & Ocoee Ranger Districts). 

 

Permit drawing applicants may only apply for either the north or the south Cherokee NF. Permits will cost $20 and are limited to one permit per person per year. Permittees must be at least 18 years of age. 

 

Five ginseng collection zones have been designated for the north Cherokee NF (Watauga & Unaka Districts), and five collection zones for the south Cherokee NF (Tellico & Ocoee Districts). One zone on each half of the Forest will be open for collecting each year. Collection zones will be rotated each year to allow plants a five year recovery period necessary to help ensure populations remain sustainable. 

 

? For 2018 the following collection zones will be open: 

 

o North Cherokee NF Zone 1: (Cherokee National Forest land within Cocke County) 

o South Cherokee NF Zone 4: (Cherokee National Forest land between Hwy 68 south of Tellico Plains and Hwy 165) 

 

All persons interested in obtaining a permit to collect ginseng in either the north or the south Cherokee National Forest for the 2018 season must submit a letter of request to: 

USDA Forest Service 

2800 Ocoee Street North 

Cleveland, TN 37312 

ATTN: Ginseng Permits 

 

Letters of request can be sent to the office listed above between Aug. 1 and Aug. 19, and must be received no later than August 19 to be included in the drawing. Letters must include: 

Applicant’s full name (person who will do collecting) 

Applicant’s mailing address 

Applicant’s phone number 

Which section of the national forest the permit is being requested for – north Cherokee NF or south Cherokee NF (only one section can be applied for) 

 

Successful permittees will be notified by letter beginning the week of September 3. In order to obtain the permit, individuals must bring the letter of notification and valid ID to the Ranger District Office identified in the notification letter to pay for and sign the permit prior to collecting. Once notified, successful applicants may obtain their permits immediately or anytime during the open season (Sept. 16-30). 

 

If you have questions or need additional information please call: Unaka Ranger District – 423- 783-2400 or Tellico Ranger District – 423-253-8400; or visit online: http://fs.usda.gov/cherokee 



A Canoe Tour On Lookout Creek Set For July 27

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park would like to invite the public to participate in a free, two-and-a-half hour, family-friendly canoe tour with a ranger on Friday, July 27, at 9 a.m. National Park Parnters and the Friends of Outdoor Chattanooga will sponsor an event where visitors will paddle the quiet waters of Lookout Creek and learn about the rich Civil War ... (click for more)

TWRA Working To Stop Asian Carp

Biologists with TWRA monitor fish populations throughout the state, including species such as invasive forms of Asian carp. There are four species of Asian carp currently in Tennessee including bighead, black, grass and silver carp. Although concerned with all invasive species, TWRA focuses on the impact of silver carp which have greatly impacted west Tennessee.   ... (click for more)

Congressman Zach Wamp Endorses Bill Lee For Governor

Former Congressman Zach Wamp endorsed Bill Lee for governor on Monday. The endorsement from Congressman Wamp, coming after last week’s endorsement from the conservative Free Press Editorial Page at The Chattanooga Times Free Press, shows Lee has built tremendous momentum as early voting is underway right now.  “It is an honor to have the support of Congressman Zach ... (click for more)

Senator Watson And Rep. Hazlewood Ask TDOT To Move Swiftly On Highway 127 Road Project Up Signal Mountain

State Senator Bo Watson (R-Hixson) and Rep. Patsy Hazlewood (R-Signal Mountain) have asked the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) to move swiftly on the Highway 127 project leading up Signal Mountain. In a sternly-worded letter, the lawmakers asked TDOT Commissioner John Schroer to prioritize the road project due to further deterioration of the road. ... (click for more)

Here We Go Again With The Same Cummings Highway, 12th Street Flooding - And Response

Here we go again with the same pitiful news reports about the Cummings Highway Interstate interchange with I-24 - Flooding yet again after a heavy rain.  TDOT is derelict in not having repaired this years ago.  How hard is it to get some excavators out there to dig up the collapsed drainage pipes which TDOT says are the cause of the flooding and replace them with ... (click for more)

Deal With The Graffiti Vandals

I travel to other neat old cities and don't see nearly the graffiti vandalism as in Chattanooga. Why do we allow one or two or three repeat vandals to mar our venerable Walnut Street Bridge, the pillars to the Holmberg Bridge, the remodeled Chief John Ross Market Street Bridge, the walls along our multi-million-dollar Riverwalk, our sidewalks, street signs and our old limestone ... (click for more)