Walden's Ridge History Topic For Guild

Friday, October 17, 2008

Karen Stone, a native of Walden's Ridge who has written several books about the mountain's history, was the speaker for the October meeting of the Walden's Ridge Guild. She told stories from her own ramblings around the area.

In the beginning, the only access to the mountain was through Levi Gap, which is above Red Bank. In walking around the area before it became as developed as it is today, she walked on an old road, now grown up, which was built by loggers and miners. Later the access to the mountain was on the site of today's W Road, which was a corduroy road, built from logs placed close together.

Walden's Ridge was know for its coal. It was very soft and caused lots of smoke but was widely used in factories in Chattanooga.

Later Walden's Ridge was a refuge for people from Chattanooga seeking escape from yellow fever and cholera. These people came up to stay during the summer and this area was known as Summertown.

Others came to live. The Conner and Rogers families were among the first to come and their children married. They lived in the Fairmount area and around them a community grew, including Fairmount Academy, the first school for white children in the area, a cemetery, post office, grocery store and church.

Mrs. Stone's latest book, a history of the Little Brown Church, will be on sale before Christmas.


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