Walden's Ridge History Topic For Guild

Friday, October 17, 2008

Karen Stone, a native of Walden's Ridge who has written several books about the mountain's history, was the speaker for the October meeting of the Walden's Ridge Guild. She told stories from her own ramblings around the area.

In the beginning, the only access to the mountain was through Levi Gap, which is above Red Bank. In walking around the area before it became as developed as it is today, she walked on an old road, now grown up, which was built by loggers and miners. Later the access to the mountain was on the site of today's W Road, which was a corduroy road, built from logs placed close together.

Walden's Ridge was know for its coal. It was very soft and caused lots of smoke but was widely used in factories in Chattanooga.

Later Walden's Ridge was a refuge for people from Chattanooga seeking escape from yellow fever and cholera. These people came up to stay during the summer and this area was known as Summertown.

Others came to live. The Conner and Rogers families were among the first to come and their children married. They lived in the Fairmount area and around them a community grew, including Fairmount Academy, the first school for white children in the area, a cemetery, post office, grocery store and church.

Mrs. Stone's latest book, a history of the Little Brown Church, will be on sale before Christmas.

Tri-state (TN-GA-AL) Rail Stops Planned but Never Built

NEW ORLEANS, MOBILE, AND CHATTANOOGA RAILROAD, 1871   Th New Orleans, Mobile, and Chattanooga Railroad (NOM&C) was the first to serve the City of New Orleans and the Central Gulf Coast.   Chartered to build a railway linking the three cities in their name, the initial intent was to build to a link from the coast with the planned Alabama and Chattanooga Railroad ... (click for more)

Chester Martin Remembers St. Elmo

I am (highly) qualified to make the brash pronouncement that St. Elmo (Chattanooga's first suburb) is as much a state of mind as it is an actual place. It is a place that gets into your mind and into your blood, and sometimes under your skin - indelibly. I have witnessed the same phenomenon in distant cities, but I do not think it is so strong an emotion there as it is here ... (click for more)

School Board Chooses Charlotte Firm For Superintendent Search Firm; Lennon, Testerman Want To Keep Kelly

The County School Board on Thursday night voted 5-4 to choose a Charlotte, N.C., search firm to pick a new county school superintendent. Coleman Lew and Associates was selected over McPherson & Jacobson of Omaha. That vote came after board members Kathy Lennon and David Testerman started the session by saying they are very pleased with Interim Supt. Kirk Kelly and would ... (click for more)

East Ridge May Revise Ordinance On Extended Stays; Fire Hall Cost Well Above Projection; Dunkin Donuts, Firehouse Subs Going Into Border Region Sector

A large portion of the East Ridge City Council meeting Thursday night was devoted to the discussion of a proposed amendment to the ordinance previously passed relating to minimum hotel and extended stay hotel requirements. The new recommendations, which the city manager, codes enforcer and city attorney have drafted after meetings with hotel associations, are that a stay can be ... (click for more)

Accountability Doesn't Have To Be A Bad Word

Am I making a difference? Isn’t that the basic question we all ask ourselves, and seek to demonstrate to others?  Ronald Reagan said:  “Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don't have that problem.”   We would argue teachers do not have that problem either.    Educators make a huge difference ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Guess Who Backed Kelly?

Two weeks before the August election where three members of the Hamilton County School Board were angrily replaced, the organizer of what was called “a great way for the (challengers) to raise great money to help them run smart campaigns” made a bold statement. “I'm sure the current board is well-intentioned, but the results are not there," said Paul Brock. "Leadership matters ... (click for more)