Corker Asks For Answers On Security Decline In Libya

Saturday, September 29, 2012

In a letter today to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, Senator Bob Corker asked for “substantive answers very quickly” regarding what has led to such a precipitous security decline in Benghazi, Libya that is preventing FBI agents from entering the city to investigate the terrorist attack on the U.S. consulate that killed four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens, 18 days ago.

“As of this morning, reports indicate that our well-trained FBI agents still have not been able to get into Benghazi to investigate. Yet just 18 days ago the administration apparently judged that it was appropriate for our consulate to be lightly guarded and it was safe for our ambassador to come through the city with a small security detail. What has changed in Libya in such a short time that even FBI agents, our most elite investigative personnel, cannot safely enter the city? What has led to such a precipitous decline?,” wrote Senator Corker in his letter. “An unwillingness to provide answers and the inaccuracy of the limited information we have received to date has undermined the credibility of the administration. To avoid further damage, I ask that you please personally respond with substantive answers very quickly.”

Corker is the cosponsor oflegislation with Senator Jim DeMint, R-S.C., to require an investigation and report on recent attacks at U.S. missions in Libya, Egypt and Yemen. On Tuesday, Corker joined Senator Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., ina letter to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton demanding more details regarding the increasing threats and security concerns that preceded attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi. He also was among all 19 members of the Foreign Relations Committee, Republicans and Democrats, to sign an additional letter this week to the State Department asking for information requested in the DeMint-Corker bill and an interim report and briefing regarding security and intelligence leading up to the Benghazi attack.

 Here is the letter:

The Honorable James R. Clapper, Jr.

Director of National Intelligence

Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Washington, D.C. 20511

Dear Director Clapper:

It seems that with each passing day, the situation surrounding the administration's response to the terrorist attack on the U. S. Consulate in Libya becomes more bizarre. The United States Congress and the American people are still waiting to get straight answers from the administration on what actually happened that led to the deaths of four Americans, including one of our ambassadors, in Benghazi on September 11, 2012.

As of this morning, reports indicate that our well-trained FBI agents still have not been able to get into Benghazi to investigate. Yet just 18 days ago the administration apparently judged that it was appropriate for our consulate to be lightly guarded and it was safe for our ambassador to come through the city with a small security detail. What has changed in Libya in such a short time that even FBI agents, our most elite investigative personnel, cannot safely enter the city? What has led to such a precipitous decline?

An unwillingness to provide answers and the inaccuracy of the limited information we have received to date has undermined the credibility of the administration. To avoid further damage, I ask that you please personally respond with substantive answers very quickly.

Sincerely,

Bob Corker

United States Senator

CC:

The Honorable Hillary R. Clinton, Secretary of State

The Honorable Leon E. Panetta, Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Robert S. Mueller, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation


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