History Center Repeats Gallery Lecture Tuesday

Monday, January 28, 2013

The Chattanooga History Center will repeat its presentation of the fourth lecture in a special preview series, Gallery Talks, at 7 p.m., Tuesday.  The series is examining each gallery visitors will encounter in the Center's new exhibit, scheduled to open late this year.  Each preview stands as an independent program, and this session presents "Imbued With the Spirit of Freedom": African American Chattanooga.  CHC Executive Director and Historian, Dr.

Daryl Black, will present the program, which will examine the reasons certain artifacts were chosen for the exhibit, and, if the stage of construction permits, include a visit to the space the gallery will occupy to gain an understanding of how it relates to the whole.  The fee is $5 per person (CHC members free).  Space is limited and pre-registration is required by Monday, February 4th.  Call 423-265-3247 to register.

     During and after the Civil War, self-emancipating slaves and their descendants created, in Chattanooga, one of the nation's most creative and cohesive African-American communities.  At the end of the war, the city's population was demographically African American, with both former slaves and free men participating in the operation of the town on many levels.  By 1875, the population was about 35% African American.  Though Jim Crow laws had countered emancipation in many respects, African Americans built a viable community, with churches at its core, and teachers important leaders.  By the end of the 19th century, a network of African American business leaders was established, and though they had very limited access to capital, they worked as lawyers and merchants serving the black community.

     The community worked hard to maintain and build up the rights of its citizens.  Throughout the decades following the Civil War, African American leaders, such as newspaper editor Randolph Miller, worked to halt the moves toward segregation and disfranchisement.  The long, slow struggle for equality in the legal system finally culminated in the change of Chattanooga's laws as a direct result of the Howard High School student-led sit-ins of 1960.

     Through the struggles of the 1950's and 60's, black Chattanoogans continued to be a vital part of the city's fabric.


Catoosa County Historical Society Meeting is December 8

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Pioneering Pulpits Exhibit Opening at the Museum Center at 5ive Points

Pioneering Pulpits Exhibit Opens Sanctuary. Faith. Community. These words – among others – are synonymous with the concept of a church. The history of the Ocoee Region churches follows the pattern generally found in this area of the South. As new lands were opened for settlement, pioneers loaded their families and chattel in wagons and set out with bright hopes for the future. ... (click for more)

Rite Aid Pharmacist Robbed At Gunpoint On Sunday

A Rite Aid pharmacist was robbed at gunpoint on Sunday.  At approximately 11:30 a.m. the Chattanooga Police Department responded to 5441 Highway 153 for a robbery from business at the Rite Aid Pharmacy.  The suspect entered the Rite Aid, approached the pharmacy counter and presented a note to the pharmacist.  The suspect then brandished a handgun, demanded ... (click for more)

Bobby Dodd Lawsuit Against City Moved To Federal Court

A lawsuit brought by former Chattanooga Police Chief Bobby Dodd against the city of Chattanooga and the Chattanooga Fire and Police Pension Fund over his pension has been moved to Federal Court. The lawsuit was earlier filed in Chancery Court by attorneys Jerry Tidwell and Adam Izell. The suit says former Chief Dodd opted for a plan that would have half of his pension go to ... (click for more)

Please Don't Close The Piccadilly Cafeteria At Hamilton Place - And Response

Oh, no. The Piccadilly Cafeteria at Hamilton Place is closing.  Its last day is Christmas Eve.  I will miss the great food they have there but most of all I will miss their servers, cashiers and waitresses.  They are all so friendly and accommodating.  They make it like it’s a home-style restaurant. I sure wish there was some way that Hamilton Place and ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: 10 Tasks For This Week

In 1993 a 95-year-old man named William Snell created a list called “Life’s Little Instructions.” His list has swirled around in the Internet ever since and it is, indeed, a delightful checklist to keep us focused in the right direction. Curiously, when I read over it this past weekend, it dawned on me that if each of us would try to accomplish just 10 items on Mr. Snell’s list ... (click for more)