“Exploration At McCallie” Educates And Entertains

Tuesday, February 5, 2013
Senior boarding student Madison DeNucci prepares for a demonstration for McCallie's Robotics Club.
Senior boarding student Madison DeNucci prepares for a demonstration for McCallie's Robotics Club.

McCallie School was the place to be for those interested in anything from augmented reality to wind farming.

“Exploration at McCallie,” held on campus on Monday, was an informative evening of education and fun. The event, formerly known as Science Night, featured 18 presentations led by students, educators and experts from the community in their respective fields.

Held in the Maclellan Academic Building, the program was organized into three 35-minute blocks, each offering participants 12 or more separate seminars from which to choose.

Fourteen McCallie teachers served as session leaders or group advisors. The 14 were Kemmer Anderson, Larry Anderson, Jersey DeMarco, Neal Dexter, Nancy Green, David Hall, Michael Lowry, Cissy May, David Mouron, Beth Reardon, Duke Richey, Scott Shoup, Ross Shumate and Ed Snow.

Girls Preparatory School was represented by three science teachers, Kristi Bryson, Tracie Durham and Erin Sizemore.

Several student academic groups held sessions with demonstrations including the Academic Bowl team, the debate team, the Model United Nations team, the Science Olympiad team and the robotics team.

Community presenters added to the event with Andrew Carroll ’95 and Matthew Carroll ’98 from Second Site LLC speaking on augmented reality; Allan Davis ’96 and Barry Large ’96 of the Lamp Post Group shared their expertise on entrepreneurship; Craig Smith ’96 gave a talk on the Battle of Missionary Ridge; Lindsey Frost Cleary from the STEM Outreach Center spoke on wind farming and engineering and Dr. Jay Sizemore and his wife Erin led a discussion on the importance of adolescent vaccines.

The annual event was hosted by TEPS, McCallie’s sophomore leadership organization.

 


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