Dalton State Introduces eMajor For Fall 2013

Tuesday, June 25, 2013
Online bachelor’s degree in Organizational Leadership is offered through Dalton State. Holli Goodwin, left, and Dr. Andy Meyer will administer eMajor at Dalton State
Online bachelor’s degree in Organizational Leadership is offered through Dalton State. Holli Goodwin, left, and Dr. Andy Meyer will administer eMajor at Dalton State

Dalton State College is rolling out eMajor for fall 2013, an online, accelerated, collaborative degree program designed especially for adults who are unable to take four years off to get a college education.


“Now adults who need a college degree in order to qualify for a particular job or advance in their current field, can do so through eMajor,” said Dr. Andy Meyer, Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs at Dalton State. “In addition to taking classes online, they may even be able to get college credit for specialty courses taken or work performed on the job, shortening their time to degree.”


eMajor is the University System of Georgia’s first full online bachelor’s degree program and Dalton State is one of only two admitting institutions in the state, Meyer said.


Currently there are three eMajor degree programs: Bachelor of Science in Office Administration and Technology, Bachelor of Science in Organizational Leadership, and Bachelor of Arts in Legal Assistant Studies. Dalton State is the first institution to join Valdosta State in the eMajor effort and is currently authorized to offer the degree in Organizational Leadership.


Each program begins with 60 hours of core classes which can be earned by successfully completing online eCore classes, “testing out” of classes, or demonstrating mastery of course material by Prior Learning Assessment.


“Prior Learning Assessment or ‘PLA’ is a process through which students identify areas of relevant learning from their past experiences and demonstrate that learning through appropriate documentation,” Meyer said. “Students interested in PLA submit their materials so they can be assessed and possibly awarded academic credit.” As many as 30 hours of credit may be earned through any combination of credit by departmental examination, national standardized examinations, correspondence courses, extension work, advanced placement, and PLA by portfolio.


The core requirements are followed by earning 60 hours of credit in upper level classes in the major field of study. Students enrolled in the Organizational Leadership major will have the option of concentrating in either Health Care Administration, Legal Office Administration, Office Administration and Technology, or Public Service Administration. A concentration in Spanish for Professionals is currently in development and should be offered soon.

“We are frequently asked if we have an online degree program, and now we are proud to say that we do,” Meyer said. “We believe eMajor is going to be a convenient and adaptable option for either starting college or resuming college after a break. We believe eMajor can be an ideal solution for combining higher education with work and family responsibilities.”


“It can also be ideal for military personnel because you can live anywhere and do eMajor,” he added.


Cost for the eMajor program is $250 per credit hour, and students are eligible for financial aid. Students enrolling through Dalton State will also pay the school’s technology fee. Initial advising for eMajor is provided by Dalton State Advisor Holli Goodwin.


Course content for eMajor is provided by faculty from Valdosta State and Dalton State. The program is operated and administered out of University of West Georgia.


For more information about the eMajor program at Dalton State, contact Holli Goodwin at 706/272-4561.



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