Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper, 37 Other Attorneys General Call On FDA To Regulate E-Cigarettes, Prohibit Sales To Minors

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper has joined 37 other attorneys general asking the FDA to place restrictions on advertising and sales to minors and ingredients contained in electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), which are growing increasingly popular as alternatives to traditional tobacco products.

The attorneys general expressed their concerns in a bipartisan letter co-sponsored by the Massachusetts and Ohio attorneys general asking the FDA to take all available measures to regulate e-cigarettes as “tobacco products” under the Tobacco Control Act. E-cigarettes, an increasingly widespread product that is growing rapidly among both youth and adults, are battery-operated products that heat liquid nicotine, derived from tobacco plants, into a vapor that is inhaled by the user.

State attorneys general have fought for years to protect people from the dangers of tobacco products. In 1998, the attorneys general of 52 states and territories signed a landmark agreement with the four largest tobacco companies in the United States to recover billions of dollars in costs associated with smoking-related illnesses, and restrict cigarette advertising to prevent youth smoking.

Unlike traditional tobacco products, there are no federal age restrictions that would prevent children from obtaining e-cigarettes. Noting the growing use of e-cigarettes, and the growing prevalence of advertising, the letter highlights the need to protect youth from becoming addicted to nicotine through these new products.

“We are always concerned when a potentially dangerous product is being sold to the public without regulation,” Attorney General Cooper said. “This is especially alarming when companies attract youth to addictive products through advertising.”

The letter to the FDA notes that e-cigarettes manufacturers have used cartoon characters (banned by tobacco manufacturers for years) and fruit and candy flavors that are often attractive to young people. In addition, the e-cigarettes and refills of liquid nicotine solution can be obtained over the Internet without age verification. 

A survey conducted by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that from 2011 to 2012, the percentages of youth who have tried or currently use e-cigarettes both roughly doubled. The survey estimates that nearly 1.8 million middle and high school students have tried e-cigarettes in 2012.

According to the U.S. surgeon general, nicotine is highly addictive and has immediate bio-chemical effects on the brain and body at any dosage, and is toxic in high doses. The lack of regulation of e-cigarettes puts youth at risk of developing a lifelong addiction to a potentially dangerous product that could also act as a gateway to using other tobacco products.

E-cigarette manufacturers are using marketing tactics similar to those big tobacco used in the last 50 to 100 years to attract new smokers. Celebrity endorsements, television advertising, cartoons, fruit flavors, attractive packaging and cheap prices all serve to encourage youth consumption of these dangerous products.

Additionally, some marketing claims lead consumers to believe these products do not contain the same level of toxins and carcinogens found in traditional cigarettes, cigars, and other tobacco products. Additionally, some marking claims imply that e-cigarettes are a safe alternative to smoking, when in fact nicotine is highly addictive, the health effects of e-cigarettes have not been adequately studied, and the ingredients are not regulated and may still contain carcinogens. The lack of regulation puts the public at risk because users of e-cigarettes are inhaling unknown chemicals with unknown effects.

The letter to the FDA can be found by clicking here.


Miller & Martin Practices, Attorneys Recognized In 2017 Chambers USA

Chambers and Partners has recognized Miller & Martin in the 2017 Chambers USA: America's Leading Lawyers for Business report as a leading law firm in the practice areas of Labor & Employment, Corporate/M&A and Litigation: General Commercial, and also recognizes six of the firm’s attorneys. Individual lawyers are ranked on the basis of their legal knowledge and experience, ... (click for more)

Chattanooga Chamber Calendar Of Events May 30-June 2

Thursday, June 1 Downtown Chamber Council Meeting 7:30  - 9 a.m. Bessie Smith Hall: 200 E M L King Blvd. Speaker: Jay Raynor, Defoor Brothers Topic: City Center Development Join the Downtown Council for networking and breakfast from 7:30 - 8 a.m., with the program lasting from 8 - 9 a.m.   $15   East Ridge Chamber Council Meeting 11:45 a.m. - ... (click for more)

Richard Anderson, 29, Struck And Killed While Trying To Cross Highway 153

Richard Anderson II, 29, was killed Friday night, while trying to cross Highway 153.   Chattanooga Police responded at 11:36 p.m. to a traffic crash involving a pedestrian struck.   A Honda Civic driven by Kelsey Hamilton, 20, was traveling southbound on Highway 153 in the middle lane with other traffic in adjacent lanes.   Mr. Anderson, wearing ... (click for more)

Eppard, 32, Charged With Aggravated Statutory Rape After 17-Year-Old He Was Living With Has Baby

Police have charged 32-year-old Anthony John Eppard with aggravated statutory rape after the 17-year-old girl he was living with had a baby. Officers were called to a civil dispute on Hillsview Drive on March 8. It was then found that the girl was living at the residence. She could not supply the name of next of kin or a legal guardian. The girl was placed in state custody, ... (click for more)

Silence Ain’t Golden Anymore

There are times – moments – in life that you never forget. That night in 1972, sleeping over at my buddy Bart’s house, was one of them. We had been to a middle school concert and his big brother was in the band (very cool stuff for a 14-year-old!) and as we lay on the floor in our sleeping bags in Bart’s room he said he wanted to play a record that his brother listened to. And, ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Prove No Improvement

The startling news that this year’s standardized testing was wasted on graduating seniors across Tennessee is most unsettling. This week it was learned the test results, which were to represent 10 percent of our seniors’ final grades, was a total bust. Coupled with last year’s gargantuan testing failure – the whole effort had to be scrapped -- it is now becoming realized that for ... (click for more)