Hamilton County 911 Announces Employees Of The Year

Monday, January 13, 2014

Officials at the Hamilton County Emergency Communications District (ECD) announced their annual employee awards at a ceremony on January 9, 2014.

TELECOMMUNICATOR OF THE YEAR:  Amanda Miller, a 3½ year veteran, made it into the national spotlight when she handled a 9-1-1 call from two young girls during a home invasion. Ms. Miller remained on the line with the girls, keeping them calm and directing them to take cover in a bedroom closet.

Her calm, professional demeanor and quick response assisted the dispatcher and ultimately the responding officers who were able to apprehend the suspects at the scene. The girls were unharmed during the incident, and later had an opportunity to meet with Ms. Miller and take a tour of the 9-1-1 Center.

SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR: Louise Williams, is a second shift supervisor and 33-year veteran.  In previous years, the Supervisor of the Year award has been given to second shift floor supervisors, working under the direction of Ms. Williams. This year, the nominations noted that without her leadership and mentorship, the supervisors working under her would not have excelled as indicated by previous awards. This year’s award recognizes her ability to rally her supervisors and employees to work together as a cohesive group, whether it is for a food drive or during a disaster—she is always fair and willing to guide everyone to participate in extra job responsibilities and additional assignments. In addition to her leadership skills, she continues to serve the District on the 911 Cares Committee.

COMMUNICATIONS TRAINING OFFICER OF THE YEAR:  Cynthia Rowe, a 15-year veteran, continues to be a top notch training officer while also serving on the 911 Cares Committee.  She truly cares about her trainees, fellow co-workers, citizens and her profession. Her nurturing nature is evident in all that she does, making the workplace a better place for everyone.

EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR:  Dr. Angel Geoghagan has served almost six years with the District as the Standards & Compliance Specialist. Dr. Geoghagan exemplified hard work and dedication to professionalism by providing expert guidance that made it possible for the District to achieve emergency communication center accreditation this year through The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA). Through her direction and unwavering commitment, the District received one of the highest evaluation scores and was able to achieve this prestigious accomplishment in less than five years of unified emergency communications implementation.

DIRECTOR’S AWARD: Jeff Carney, director of Operations, was surprised by a presentation from Executive Director Stuermer for his dedication and hard work in bringing the district to such a level of excellence in five years. Executive Director Stuermer noted that it simply could not have been accomplished without Director Carney's hard work, dedication and willingness to do all that was asked of him and beyond—pushing the District’s employees to reach beyond ordinary standards, to become masters of their profession and to re-dedicate themselves to the business of serving the public and client agencies.

Each recipient of an annual performance award received a plaque and certificate of achievement.

The Hamilton County 911 Emergency Communications District employs more than 130 telecommunicators who answer an approximate average of 2,000 to 2,500 calls for service each day from residents and visitors in Hamilton County.  Telecommunicators also dispatch responders for all public safety response disciplines – law enforcement, fire and EMS – across 26 various agencies.



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