Program on Dalton's Great Snowball Battle of 1864 is March 22

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park invites the public to participate in a free ranger-led presentation focusing on one of the most unorthodox battles during the Civil War on Saturday, March 22, 2014.  The 45-minute program will begin at 2 pm and will be held in the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center Theater.

During the winter months of 1864, Confederate soldiers encamped at Dalton, Georgia, decided to momentarily exchange their rifles for a far less deadly weapon.

In the frozen landscape of a fresh snow, the grim veterans of the Army of Tennessee fought a battle with themselves, known as the Great Snowball Battle of 1864. The fight was so unique that one participant said there was “nothing like it in the history of the world.”  Although soldiers witnessed many horrible actions on battlefields across the nation, this event proved they were not callous and could still find a moment to relax and have fun. 

For more information about programs at Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, contact the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center at (706) 866-9241, the Lookout Mountain Battlefield Visitor Center at (423) 821-7786, or visit the park’s website at www.nps.gov/chch.

www.nps.gov

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 401 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.


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