Program on Dalton's Great Snowball Battle of 1864 is March 22

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park invites the public to participate in a free ranger-led presentation focusing on one of the most unorthodox battles during the Civil War on Saturday, March 22, 2014.  The 45-minute program will begin at 2 pm and will be held in the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center Theater.

During the winter months of 1864, Confederate soldiers encamped at Dalton, Georgia, decided to momentarily exchange their rifles for a far less deadly weapon.

In the frozen landscape of a fresh snow, the grim veterans of the Army of Tennessee fought a battle with themselves, known as the Great Snowball Battle of 1864. The fight was so unique that one participant said there was “nothing like it in the history of the world.”  Although soldiers witnessed many horrible actions on battlefields across the nation, this event proved they were not callous and could still find a moment to relax and have fun. 

For more information about programs at Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, contact the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center at (706) 866-9241, the Lookout Mountain Battlefield Visitor Center at (423) 821-7786, or visit the park’s website at www.nps.gov/chch.

www.nps.gov

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 401 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.



Chattanooga History Books By John Wilson Available At Zarzour's Restaurant, By Mail

John Wilson, former Hamilton County Historian and publisher of Chattanoogan.com, has written two volumes on the early families of Hamilton County and also books on Chattanooga and on Lookout Mountain, as well as editing books on Chattanooga's railroads and the Stokes and Hiener photo collections. Railroads In And Around Chattanooga , featuring Chattanooga's intriguing railroad ... (click for more)

Beans Helped Settle Tennessee; Some Moved On To Hamilton County

William and Lydia Bean are celebrated as the first permanent settlers in the section that became Tennessee, and their son, Russell Bean,was the first white child born within the confines of the state. As the descendants of William Bean spread out from the vicinity of the Watauga River, some of them made their way to Hamilton County. William Hamilton Bean, grandson of Russell ... (click for more)

Walker County Residents May Face Special Levy To Deal With Erlanger Debt, Penny SPLOST Transportation Tax On Top Of 2 Mil Property Tax Rise

Walker County, Ga., residents may face a special levy to deal with the Erlanger Health System debt as well as a new penny SPLOST transportation tax - on top of a planned two mil property tax rise. The two mil would equal to $80 on a $100,000 home. Sole Commissioner Shannon Whitfield said all of that is to take care of mountains of debt he said he inherited from the Bebe Heiskell ... (click for more)

New Superintendent Johnson To Set Up Opportunity Zone For Low Performing Schools

New County School Supt. Dr. Bryan Johnson said he plans to set up an Opportunity Zone for low performing schools. He said in a memo: In our ongoing efforts to improve student achievement I would like to establish an Opportunity Zone that would specifically focus on our Priority schools and schools on the cusp. The initial schools that would receive support through this structure ... (click for more)

Shame On Anyone Planning A Protest At Coolidge Park Thursday Evening - And Response (7)

Whether you're Alt-Left or Alt-Right, Coolidge Park isn't the place to showcase your hate and indifference with one another. Just because it's your right, that doesn't necessarily mean that you should do it. Many have this misconception that this park is named after a President, Nope. It's named after a great man, a true patriot, and Medal of Honor recipient from right ... (click for more)

A Tale Of 3 Properties

Here in Lookout Valley on the far southwest edge of Chattanooga and Hamilton County, trees and rocks are plentiful but sidewalks are as rare as unicorns. It’s a land the governments forget – until tax collection time.  The recent county reappraisal spoke about ‘comps,’ recent sale prices of comparable local properties. But the assessors defined ‘comparable’ to suit themselves, ... (click for more)