The Battles for Chattanooga, Volume 7 to be Released Oct. 9-12

Friday, September 27, 2013

The Battles for Chattanooga, Volume 7 in the Tennessee in the Civil War legacy book series, is released in conjunction with the 2013 Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Signature Event taking place Oct. 9-12 in Chattanooga. The latest volume surveys the events leading up to the fight for Chattanooga, the effects of occupation, and the battles of 1863.

The Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission partnered with the Tennessee Historical Society with support from the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area to produce a legacy book series, Tennessee in the Civil War. Volumes 1-7 have been released, with a total of twelve slated to be released through 2015. Volumes in the series examine the great battles, controversial leaders, first-hand accounts, occupation, experiences on the homefront, women's roles, the triumph of African Americans, and the legacy of the Civil War.

“Why does the Civil War matter? In Tennessee, in 2013, the war still touches our lives in many ways,” said Ann Toplovich, executive director, Tennessee Historical Society. “This book series tells the great stories of brave men in battle, but also reveals the horrors of a home front occupied by the enemy. It chronicles the trials and triumphs of a people seeking new freedoms. A new vision for Tennessee emerged from the Civil War. The best articles by the best Civil War writers are collected in Tennessee in the Civil War.”

Since 1942, the Tennessee Historical Society has published almost 400 articles on the Civil War in the Volunteer State in its journal, the Tennessee Historical Quarterly. The best of these are being gathered in special volumes through 2015. Each trade-quality, soft cover book is approximately 225 pages, printed on acid-free paper, and includes illustrations, maps, and an index.

The series editor is Dr. Carroll Van West, director of MTSU Center for Historic Preservation and Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area and co-chair of the Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission.

  • Tennessee in the Civil War, Volume 1, provides an overview of the Civil War in the Volunteer State, from its causes to its consequences.
  • The Civil War in Appalachia, Volume 2, focuses on the war in East Tennessee.
  • The Battle of Shiloh, Volume 3, examines that battle, from eye-witness accounts to preservation.
  • The Battle of Stones River and the Fight for Middle Tennessee, Volume 4, studies one of the bloodiest battles of the war, as well as the Battle of Thompson’s Station, the Tullahoma Campaign, and more.
  • Nathan Bedford Forrest and the Confederate Cavalry in West Tennessee, Volume 5, looks at West Tennessee battles and profiles key officers such as Hylan Lyon, “Red” Jackson, and Frank Armstrong.
  • Emancipation and the Fight for Freedom: Tennessee African Americans, 1860-1900, Volume 6, explores the ways African Americans seized new freedom, defying oppression and establishing schools as a path for advancement.
  • The Battles for Chattanooga, Volume 7, surveys the events leading up to the fight for Chattanooga, the effects of occupation, and the battles of 1863.
Tennessee in the Civil War Volumes 1-7 can also be ordered online at www.tennesseehistory.org, by calling the Tennessee Historical Society at 615-741-8934 or emailing info@tennesseehistory.org

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