David Brill Speaks At Chattanooga Writers' Guild Tuesday

Tuesday, June 10, 2014
David Brill
David Brill

David Brill, a national nonfiction magazine writer, will speak at the Chattanooga Writers' Guild on Tuesday at the Downtown Chattanooga Public Library.  The evening will begin with a meet and greet at 6 p.m., accolades at 6:20 p.m. adn the program from 6:30-8 p.m.
 
Mr. Brill will speak on how to generate and focus story ideas, how to identify receptive markets for your work and how to draft irresistible query letters. 

Mr. Brill's essays, personality profiles, and articles on science, ecology, the environment, business, health, fitness, parenting, and adventure-travel have appeared in more than 30 national and regional magazines, including National Geographic Traveler, Men's Health, and AARP The Magazine. He has written extensively about Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Mr. Brill has published four nonfiction books. As Far as the Eye Can See: Reflections of an Appalachian Trail Hiker (UT Press and Appalachian Trail Conservancy, 2013) is a collection of essays based on his six-month, 2,100-mile trek of the Appalachian Trail, which stretches from Georgia to Maine. The book is now in its seventh printing, fourth edition.

A Separate Place: A Family, a Cabin in the Woods, and a Journey of Love and Spirit (Dutton, 2000), chronicles the author's efforts to strengthen his bonds with his daughters and rekindle connection to the natural and spiritual world by retreating to a 600-square foot cabin in Morgan County, Tenn. 

Desire and Ice: Searching for Perspective atop Denali (National Geographic Adventure Press, 2002) recounts the ascent of eight amateur mountaineers to the 20,320-foot summit of Denali (Mt. McKinley), the highest peak in North America and one of the coldest mountains on Earth. The book features the images of National Geographic photographer Bill Hatcher 

Cumberland Odyssey: A Journey in Pictures and Words along Tennessee's Cumberland Trail and Plateau (Mountain Trail Press, 2010) explores the natural and cultural history of the Cumberland Plateau and features Mr. Brill's essays and the nature photography of Bill Campbell.

Mr. Brill is a full-time resident of Morgan County, and he, his wife, Belinda, and their dog, Zebulon, occupy a cabin near Clear Creek.


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