Agape Art Academy Student Wins Tennessee’s Best Of Show

Thursday, July 10, 2014

All of the Agape Art Academy students, about 50 per year (not including adults), participate in the Federal Junior Duck Stamp contest, regardless of their beginner or advanced status.  The contest is designed for school-aged children, K-12, to promote conservation.  

Students choose a species of duck and study it, as well as its habitat. They then create a realistic drawing based on their knowledge. The Best of Show recipient across the nation wins $5,000, and their drawing is made into $5 postage stamp.  

This year, 14-year-old McKenzie Covrig from Georgetown, Tn., a four year student with Agape Art Academy, won Best of Show in Tennessee with her watercolor of a pair of green winged teals.  Along with the honor of winning, she received a $1,500 scholarship, and her drawing will be made into a Tennessee wildlife stamp. She was honored at the annual award ceremony in Nashville. There are 100 awards given away in each state, with 23 percent of Tennessee’s award going to Agape students this year.

The realism displayed in the duck stamp contest is an example of Agape Art Academy’s approach to art.  Agape is a Christian based, eight-year academy that focuses on that realistic approach to drawing and painting. Students are taught to carefully observe God’s creation. They are then taught many skills in the different disciplines of drawing and painting, in order to recreate the beauty of God’s creation. A classical, structured, disciplined approach is used with each lesson building upon the next.

Every year that Agape has entered they have won 20 to 25 percent of the awards in Tennessee.  In the last 10 years, they have won five Best of Show awards, four in Tennessee and one in Georgia.  Students who take art with Agape often win when they enter their “Agape” artwork in the other school contests as well.

The success rate is amazing, but it would be nothing if the students were not enjoying themselves. Children want to come back year after year, and parents are very satisfied with the lessons, said officials.

People often ask “Are all your students naturally talented?” The answer is no. When students are taught the principles of drawing with a structured, disciplined, classical method, all students learn to draw, whether a child or an adult. 

The core curriculum, the eight year program is taught to children ages 10-19. Pre-Basic classes are also offered for children 6-9 years old. Classes are available for homeschoolers and public school children.  Adults can take eight weeks of class or can also continue for five years. Many adults continue for several years.

Agape Art Academy will be a vendor at the 2014 Education Expo and Home School Curriculum Fair held at Camp Jordan, July 18 and 19 at Camp Jordan.

School year classes begin in the week of Aug. 11.  Agape’s classes are held at local Hobby Lobbies in Chattanooga, Hixson and Cleveland. 

For more information, contact Karen Barton at 877-AGAPE (2427) or agapeartacademy@yahoo.com.



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