Agape Art Academy Student Wins Tennessee’s Best Of Show

Thursday, July 10, 2014

All of the Agape Art Academy students, about 50 per year (not including adults), participate in the Federal Junior Duck Stamp contest, regardless of their beginner or advanced status.  The contest is designed for school-aged children, K-12, to promote conservation.  

Students choose a species of duck and study it, as well as its habitat. They then create a realistic drawing based on their knowledge. The Best of Show recipient across the nation wins $5,000, and their drawing is made into $5 postage stamp.  

This year, 14-year-old McKenzie Covrig from Georgetown, Tn., a four year student with Agape Art Academy, won Best of Show in Tennessee with her watercolor of a pair of green winged teals.  Along with the honor of winning, she received a $1,500 scholarship, and her drawing will be made into a Tennessee wildlife stamp. She was honored at the annual award ceremony in Nashville. There are 100 awards given away in each state, with 23 percent of Tennessee’s award going to Agape students this year.

The realism displayed in the duck stamp contest is an example of Agape Art Academy’s approach to art.  Agape is a Christian based, eight-year academy that focuses on that realistic approach to drawing and painting. Students are taught to carefully observe God’s creation. They are then taught many skills in the different disciplines of drawing and painting, in order to recreate the beauty of God’s creation. A classical, structured, disciplined approach is used with each lesson building upon the next.

Every year that Agape has entered they have won 20 to 25 percent of the awards in Tennessee.  In the last 10 years, they have won five Best of Show awards, four in Tennessee and one in Georgia.  Students who take art with Agape often win when they enter their “Agape” artwork in the other school contests as well.

The success rate is amazing, but it would be nothing if the students were not enjoying themselves. Children want to come back year after year, and parents are very satisfied with the lessons, said officials.

People often ask “Are all your students naturally talented?” The answer is no. When students are taught the principles of drawing with a structured, disciplined, classical method, all students learn to draw, whether a child or an adult. 

The core curriculum, the eight year program is taught to children ages 10-19. Pre-Basic classes are also offered for children 6-9 years old. Classes are available for homeschoolers and public school children.  Adults can take eight weeks of class or can also continue for five years. Many adults continue for several years.

Agape Art Academy will be a vendor at the 2014 Education Expo and Home School Curriculum Fair held at Camp Jordan, July 18 and 19 at Camp Jordan.

School year classes begin in the week of Aug. 11.  Agape’s classes are held at local Hobby Lobbies in Chattanooga, Hixson and Cleveland. 

For more information, contact Karen Barton at 877-AGAPE (2427) or agapeartacademy@yahoo.com.



STEM Teacher Fellows To Be Recognized On Tuesday

PEF and the Southeast Tennessee STEM Innovation Hub will recognize 27 educators from Southeast Tennessee who have completed a Fellowship in STEM teaching and best practices on Tuesday, May 26 from 3-4 p.m. at STEM School Chattanooga, located on the Chattanooga State campus.   Chattanooga Chamber of Commerce CEO Bill Kilbride will speak about the importance of STEM education ... (click for more)

Bea Lyons Honored At “Tea For Bea”

When Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Kimberly McCormick, established the Faculty Fellows Program during 2014, several well-known and respected educators were named as inaugural fellows. The Social and Behavioral Science Division honored Bea Lyons as its fellow. A special “Tea for Bea” was recently held to serve as a springboard for the first endowed fellowship ... (click for more)

City Applying For Federal Grant To Extend River Trail To Moccasin Bend In $2.23 Million Project

The city is applying for a $1.6 million federal grant that would be a key part of the funding needed to extend a trail by the Tennessee River from Renaissance Park to Moccasin Bend. The city is seeking an Eastern Federal Highway Division grant to go along with $234,260 of city funds. The state portion would be $259,692.  Grants from the Lyndhurst and Benwood Foundations ... (click for more)

Flora Tydings Selected As Chattanooga State’s Next President

Flora Tydings is expected to be named the next president to lead Chattanooga State Community College pending approval by the Tennessee Board of Regents at a special called meeting next Wednesday. The board will meet at 9:30 a.m. CDT at the TBR System Office in Nashville. Included on the agenda is TBR Chancellor John Morgan’s recommendation for Dr. Tydings to replace Interim President ... (click for more)

Don't Make A Mockery Of Memorial Day - And Response

We're told Memorial Day is the day to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice in order that we, as Americans and others around the world, might live free, unshackled (invisible or otherwise) and without oppression. But how is that so when so many in America continue to be denied those freedoms? Others whose family and friends made the ultimate sacrifice? Their surviving families ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: A Great Orthopedic Success

Mark Freeman, the chief of orthopedic surgery at Erlanger Hospital, shared a dazzling look at our area’s Level One Trauma Center Friday morning. Yet, as he described the dramatic changes that have occurred in just the past 12 months, the promise of what will happen within the next year was even more appealing. Believe this, our flagship hospital is getting well in a hurry. “If ... (click for more)