Dalton State Offers Teacher Certification Program For Non-Teachers

Monday, April 8, 2013

The University of North Georgia in partnership with Dalton State College will offer a one-year teacher certification program for individuals currently holding a bachelor’s degree or higher which will make them eligible to teach in their content area at the middle school or high school level.


The non-credit program is approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission and is projected to begin in late May on the Dalton State campus.


“This program provides the opportunity for those who have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher to teach in their content area,” said Dr. Sharon Hixon, Associate Professor of Education at Dalton State and campus coordinator for the program. “It can be an ideal solution for the adult learner looking to make a career change.”


“I am impressed with the level of interest people have shown in this concept,” said Hixon who added that classes  will be taught by faculty from Dalton State’s School of Education and University of North Georgia. 

“The career chemist can go back and teach high school chemistry; the public relations specialist who earned a degree in English will be qualified to teach English,” she said. “This is a terrific opportunity for those who have always wanted to teach but never earned a teaching degree.”


“There is especially high demand for science and math teachers, so this program could be a good fit for recent college graduates who have not found work yet in their content area,” she said. 

The program combines face to face instruction with online coursework. Students typically meet as a cohort for one evening every other week and are expected to complete assignments concurrently via interactive educational websites.


The last semester of the program consists of a three-week practicum and a 17-week internship in a classroom that corresponds to each participant’s chosen content area.


Based on guidelines of the GAPSC, participants must select a teaching field that correlates to the degree they hold.

No college credit is awarded; instead, non-credit Professional Learning Units are awarded for the completion of program courses. Hixon pointed out that PLUs are approved by the Georgia Department of Education. “Because this program is non-degree seeking and only allows individuals to obtain a teaching certificate, there is no government financial aid available,” she said.


Cost of the program is $7,000 which can be divided into three installments over the course of the participants first five months of enrollment. The fee covers courses earned for PLU credit, technology, the assessment management system, and books.


For more information, interested individuals are invited to contact Sharon Hixon at shixon@daltonstate.edu or 706/272-2044.


Chattanooga State Offers Continuing Education Classes In December & January

Chattanooga State’s Continuing Education Department is offering two classes in December and one in January 2017. Santa’s LEGO Workshop: Calling all LEGO-building elves! Santa is looking for children ages 6-10 to have fun at Santa’s LEGO Workshop on Monday, December 19 – Wednesday, December 21, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. He has lots of Christmas models and fun challenges ... (click for more)

Chattanooga COC Surprises Brown Academy With $1,000 Gift For School Uniforms

Brown Academy Principal Emily Baker shared with the Downtown Council some of the challenges faced by students living in Chattanooga area homeless shelters in finding uniforms. Brown Academy has a clothes closet to help meet student needs, and her wish is to be able to provide as many new uniforms as possible for her students. At a Downtown Council meeting this week, Ms. Baker ... (click for more)

Lawsuit Says Girl Received Severe Traumatic Brain Injury In Woodmore Bus Wreck

A new lawsuit in the tragic Woodmore Elementary School bus wreck said one girl on the bus suffered a severe traumatic brain injury. Attorneys Joseph Fried and Michael Goldberg of Fried Rogers Goldberg LLC filed a lawsuit in Hamilton County Circuit Court on behalf of the minor daughter of Shanquatta Byrd. The bus driver, Johnthony Walker, was transporting 37 students from ... (click for more)

Officer Who Was Shot Returned Fire; Is Recovering Well; Shooter Still On Loose

Chattanooga Police Chief Fred Fletcher said Monday morning that the officer who was shot three times on Thursday is recovering well.   Chief Fletcher said the officer was wearing a bullet-proof vest and one bullet hit the vest, which protected him during the shooting.  The officer was able to return fire, although Chief Fletcher would not comment on how many bullets ... (click for more)

Signal Mountain Couldn't Manage Public Education

I have been reading the buzz about Signal Mountain and other small municipalities considering a move to form their own school district within their municipal boundaries.  It is quite the comedy hour considering the notion that small cities that for decades could not even manage small sewer systems or 911 districts, are somehow going to do a better job with public education ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: School Board Can’t Wait

It took the Hamilton County School board nine months before the group hired a search firm to find a new superintendent. But you mark my words – the Department of Education will undoubtedly implode if our leaders wait another nine months simply hoping for some type of mystical salvation. In the last week Signal Mountain leaders have all but given notice they will form their own district ... (click for more)