Governor’s Office Of Student Achievement Seeks Governor’s Honors Program Alumni

Friday, August 16, 2013

The Governor’s Office of Student Achievement and the Governor’s Honors Program Alumni Association seek the names and contact information of the more than 20,000 alumni from the 50 years of operation of the Governor’s Honors Program (GHP), the summer residential learning experience for the state’s highest achieving high school students.  Graduates of this program have been and continue to be leaders in Georgia, completing college and prestigious graduate programs, and moving into influential business, artistic, legal, medical, and political positions.   

The Office of Student Achievement invites all alumni of the Georgia Governor's Honors Program to update their contact information by visiting https://gosa.georgia.gov/webform/ghp-alumni-information

Alumni whose contact information is updated by Sept. 3, will receive an invitation to attend a gala fundraiser and silent auction at the Governor’s Mansion in October in celebration of the Governor’s Honors Program’s 50th Anniversary.   

"The first ever GHP gala will be a great opportunity to reconnect with old GHP friends and make new ones among a group that brings so much pride to their nominating teachers and schools,” stated Roger Harrison President of the GHP Alumni Association. “Honoring alumni success at the Governor’s Mansion is a great way to keep in touch and hear how the program positively affected kids years after they participated in GHP." 

The Georgia Governor's Honors Program is a four-week, summer residential program designed to provide intellectually gifted and artistically talented high school students challenging and enriching educational opportunities not usually available during the regular school year.  Activities provide each participant with opportunities to acquire the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to become independent, life-long learners.  The Georgia Governor's Honors Program is fully funded by the Georgia General Assembly and operates at no cost to participants. High School sophomores and juniors in public, private, and home schools are eligible for nomination in one of several areas, including music, visual arts, dance, theatre, biology, chemistry, physics, social studies, mathematics, design, technology, executive management, AgScience/biotechnology, AgScience/environmental, communicative arts, French, German, Latin, and Spanish.  Governor Nathan Deal signed an executive order transferring the administration of the Governor’s Honors Program to the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement in August 2013.

The Governor’s Office of Student Achievement strives to increase student achievement and school completion across Georgia through meaningful, transparent, and objective analysis and communication of statewide data. In addition, GOSA provides policy support to the Governor and, ultimately, to the citizens of Georgia through:

An education report card that indicates the effectiveness of Georgia's education institutions, from Pre-K through college;

Research initiatives on education programs in Georgia and corresponding findings to inform policy, budget, and legislative efforts;

Innovative programs that support achievement of the Governor’s statewide education goals;

Thorough analysis and straightforward communication of education data to stakeholders;

Audits of academic programs to ensure that education institutions are fiscally responsible with state funds and faithful to performance accountability requirements; and

Collaborative work with the Alliance of Education Agency Heads (AEAH) to improve education statewide.



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