Chattanooga State Features Jamar Rogers For National HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Friday, January 31, 2014
Jamar Rogers
Jamar Rogers

Chattanooga State’s Community Health Institute presents National HIV/AIDS Awareness Day featuring Jamar Rogers, former finalist of NBC’s The Voice, on Wednesday, February 5 at 10 a.m. in the Humanities Theatre. The program includes exhibits with giveaways, free on-site HIV screenings, and a question and answer session with health professionals. The program is offered in partnership with Tennessee Department of Health, Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department, Chattanooga Cares, Channels of Love Ministries, The Home Place, Ryan B White Part B Program, Minority AIDS Initiative and the Southeast-TN Development District. The event is free and open to the public.

Growing up, Jamar showed tremendous talent for singing as early as six years of age, but soon fell prey to the emotional problems that come with growing up in a fatherless household and became addicted to drugs to fill the missing piece.  As his life began to spiral out of control, the unthinkable happened; Jamar was declared HIV-positive. Completely broken, Jamar somehow found light in the darkest time of his life and began to turn things around.

Acknowledging his experience, Jamar Rogers said, “my message is that of love and of redemption, that you can put your mind to whatever you want to and I don’t care what it is you have been through. If you are willing to live your best life; you really can do that.”

Jamar Rogers is one of the more than 1.1 million people living with HIV infection in United States. According to federal statistics, every nine and a half minutes another person in the U.S. is infected with HIV contributing to approximately 50,000 new infections in the U.S. each year. Statistics in the southern region of the United States are alarming. The South accounts for only 37 percent of the population, but approximately 50 percent of new HIV diagnoses. In Tennessee, there were a total of 923 new cases of HIV and 19,083 people living with HIV by the end of 2012. HIV is primarily transmitted through unprotected sex and sharing needles with someone who has HIV. There is no cure for HIV or AIDS, but it is preventable and treatable. 

“After 30 years, we have made significant strides, but our work is not done until we end HIV transmission. We must continue our collective community education, prevention, testing, and treatment efforts. We must also address the root causes of HIV,” says Dr. Shanell L. McGoy, Director of the HIV/STD Section, Tennessee Department of Health. 

Helen Adams, Minority AIDS Initiative Coordinator at the Tennessee Department of Health says, “African-Americans comprise the burden of HIV, both nationally and in the State of Tennessee. In Hamilton County (Chattanooga), African-Americans represent approximately 20 percent of the population and make up 62 percent of new cases and 44 percent of people living with HIV/AIDS as of 2012. There are many social factors that contribute to HIV among African-Americans—poverty, not knowing one’s status, stigma, fear, homophobia, and even compliancy, but there is hope. Jamar Rogers is proof that you can overcome any obstacle and live a full life with a positive status.”

Laurie Tucker, STD Supervisor, Chattanooga-Hamilton Co. Health Department said, “Nationally one in six people are unaware of their status. The test is free. Take the test, know your status.”

For more information about the event, scall 697-2568.



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