Historic Tour Through Cherokee Lands Offered For Teachers

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Red Clay State Park and the Friends of Red Clay will host A Historic Tour Through Cherokee Lands, a workshop for K-12 public, private and homeschool teachers, on Tuesday, June 17, and Tuesday, July 15, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

The workshop is designed to assist teachers in interpreting the history and culture of the Native Cherokee who once inhabited the southeastern region of the U.S. 

Morning sessions will include lectures from Dr. Mike Toomey, chairman of the History Department of Lincoln Memorial University and Genealogist and Researcher for the Cherokee Genealogy Services Anita Finger-Smith.

Afternoon sessions will include exhibits, demonstrations and an interpretive tour of the park led by Park Manager Erin Medley. The afternoon session will conclude with Cherokee myths and legends led by storytellers Kathi Littlejohn and Freeman Owle. 

There is a $30 fee for the workshop, which includes lunch and activities. For additional information, visit www.FriendsofRedClay.org.   

Red Clay State Historic Park is located in the extreme southwest corner of Bradley County, just above the Tennessee-Georgia state line, and is the site of 11 of the last 12 Cherokee Council meetings before the infamous Trail of Tears. The park encompasses 263 acres of narrow valley and forested ridges and features picnic facilities, a loop trail and amphitheater. The park also contains a natural landmark, the Blue Hole Spring, which arises from beneath a limestone ledge to form a deep pool that flows into Mill Creek. The Cherokee used the Blue Hole Spring as their water supply during council meetings. For more information about the park, please visit http://tnstateparks.com/parks/about/red-clay.

GNTC Holds Graduation Ceremony For Its Paralegal Certificate Program

Georgia Northwestern Technical College (GNTC) held a graduation ceremony for the Paralegal Certificate program at the auditorium on the Gordon County Campus in Calhoun. Paralegals are crucial members of a law firm’s team. They also have job opportunities in the legal departments of large corporations, government offices, and as independent contractors. Paralegals specialize ... (click for more)

Former Baylor School Headmaster Douglas Hale to Retire From Pennsylvania School

Douglas Hale, head of school at Mercersburg Academy in  Mercersburg, Pa., announced Tuesday that he will retire at the end of the  2015-2016 school year. Mr. Hale has served as Mercersburg’s head of school since his appointment in  1997. He went to Mercersburg after 24 years at Baylor School in  Chattanooga, where he had been a teacher, associate headmaster, ... (click for more)

Chattanooga Police Detective Karl Fields Terminated On Code Of Conduct Charges

Karl Fields, former Chattanooga Police detective, was terminated on Wednesday on code of conduct charges. The Chattanooga Police Department said it received a correspondence from the Hamilton County District Attorney’s Office o n Sept. 4, 2014,  informing it of allegations of inappropriate behavior committed by a CPD investigator during the course of a rape investigation. ... (click for more)

Autopsy Says 5-Year-Old Whitwell Boy Died Of Blunt Force Trauma

An autopsy on five-year-old Lucas Dillon of Whitwell says he died of blunt force trauma. The TBI is investigating the death, which is being treated as a homicide. The child, who lived on Jewell Lane Road, was injured on Saturday and died in a hospital on Monday. Lucas was a student at Whitwell Head Start. (click for more)

Physicians Thank Their Patients On Doctor’s Day

March 30 has been set aside as National Doctors’ Day since 1933 as a time to recognize the contributions made by our physicians. While the recognition is appreciated, our greatest satisfaction comes from caring for our patients.  For 132 years, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Medical Society has been the physicians’ voice as we worked together to improve health of our community. ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: A Tragedy And A Triumph

Two summers ago there was a 15-year-old boy at Atlanta’s Egleston children’s hospital with two big problems. Doctors had discovered the child had dilated cardiomyopathy and the left ventricle in his heart was failing to pump enough blood. Doctors predicted that without a heart transplant he would only live six to nine more months. His other problem was a court-ordered monitoring ... (click for more)