Historic Tour Through Cherokee Lands Offered For Teachers

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Red Clay State Park and the Friends of Red Clay will host A Historic Tour Through Cherokee Lands, a workshop for K-12 public, private and homeschool teachers, on Tuesday, June 17, and Tuesday, July 15, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

The workshop is designed to assist teachers in interpreting the history and culture of the Native Cherokee who once inhabited the southeastern region of the U.S. 

Morning sessions will include lectures from Dr. Mike Toomey, chairman of the History Department of Lincoln Memorial University and Genealogist and Researcher for the Cherokee Genealogy Services Anita Finger-Smith.

Afternoon sessions will include exhibits, demonstrations and an interpretive tour of the park led by Park Manager Erin Medley. The afternoon session will conclude with Cherokee myths and legends led by storytellers Kathi Littlejohn and Freeman Owle. 

There is a $30 fee for the workshop, which includes lunch and activities. For additional information, visit www.FriendsofRedClay.org.   

Red Clay State Historic Park is located in the extreme southwest corner of Bradley County, just above the Tennessee-Georgia state line, and is the site of 11 of the last 12 Cherokee Council meetings before the infamous Trail of Tears. The park encompasses 263 acres of narrow valley and forested ridges and features picnic facilities, a loop trail and amphitheater. The park also contains a natural landmark, the Blue Hole Spring, which arises from beneath a limestone ledge to form a deep pool that flows into Mill Creek. The Cherokee used the Blue Hole Spring as their water supply during council meetings. For more information about the park, please visit http://tnstateparks.com/parks/about/red-clay.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Awards Scholarship Funds To Chattanooga State

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has awarded $146,845 to fund scholarships for students in nuclear-related programs at Chattanooga State Community College. The donation made to the Chattanooga State’s Nuclear Scholarship Program will provide 32 scholarships to full-time students majoring in one of four nuclear-related programs of study in the Engineering ... (click for more)

New $1.1 Million Gift Establishes W. Max Finley Chair For Excellence In American Business At UTC

Continuing a legacy of support for UTC, a $1.1 million gift from the Finley family has created the W. Max Finley Chair for Excellence in American Business to honor the entrepreneurial energy and career of the late W. Max Finley, former chairman of the RockTenn Corporation.  The W. Max Finley Chair will employ or retain a distinguished faculty member for the UTC College of ... (click for more)

Signal Council, Residents Concerned About Unsafe Driving En Route To Schools

The town council of Signal Mountain is dealing with a traffic problem caused by increased traffic to and from Signal Mountain Middle High School and Nolan Elementary. Mayor Dick Gee said, “This is a tough issue that we wouldn’t have to deal with if everyone would drive responsibly.” The main concern is for safety and in November the council agreed to try to fix the problem by ... (click for more)

88-Year-Old Woman In Bradley County Severely Burned After Going Back In Burning House For Pets

Two people were injured in a house fire in Bradley County on Friday.   Shortly before noon, Bradley County EMS responded to a reported house fire on Hancock Road.   Two ambulances and a shift commander responded. Initial reports were that there were two people injured. When EMS crews arrived, Bradley County firefighters were performing resuscitative ... (click for more)

We Ought To Pay Our Own Way

The government is too big. It has never been bigger - by any measure. It spends more money than any other single actor in our society. From Blue Rhinos to providing telecommunications services, our government knows no bounds. We’ve gone from a free enterprise system to a public enterprise system.  I'm not an artist. I'm not terribly tech savvy. The part of government that ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The Secret Train Ride

It was during Christmas of 2003 when Bennett Levin and his wife found themselves talking and worrying about the wounded soldiers at the Walter Reed Military Hospital in Bethesda, Md., and at the nearby Bethesda Naval Hospital. Their wish was that they could do something meaningful, something really grand, for the soldiers who had lost limbs, their eyesight, and far worse. As ... (click for more)