Chickamauga Battlefield Education Day Integrated Learning Experience Open To Local School Districts

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park invites local eighth grade classes to participate in a unique, rotating educational program commemorating the 154th anniversary of the Battle of Chickamauga. The program, which last 90 minutes, will be offered in three time blocks on Tuesday, Sept. 19: 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 12 p.m. (noon).

Reservations are required and times will be assigned on a first come, first served basis. Interested schools can contact Park Ranger Chris Young for registration information at 423-752-5213 x 117, or by emailing

gov">christopher_young@nps.gov.

On Sept. 18–20, 1863, Union and Confederate soldiers fought one another at Chickamauga, resulting in the second costliest battle of the Civil War. Education Day will combine the history of the battle with associated literature and mathematics to provide students multiple opportunities to connect with the narrative of Chickamauga and the Civil War.  Activities are meant to enrich the existing American History curriculum by allowing students to tangibly engage with their local national park.

For more information about programs at Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, contact the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center at 706-866-9241, the Lookout Mountain Battlefield Visitor Center at 423-821-7786, or visit the park website at www.nps.gov/chch.  



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