2018-19 Waterfowl Hunting Regulations, New Officers Election Set For TFWC Meeting

Friday, February 16, 2018

The 2018-19 state waterfowl hunting regulations will be among the agenda items addressed when the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission meets Feb. 27-28, in Nashville at the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s Region II Ray Bell Building. In addition, the TFWC will elect its new officers for 2018-19.

The committee meetings will begin at 1 p.m. on Tuesday. The regular TFWC meeting will start at 9a.m., Wednesday. The public is invited to attend.

A preview of the regulations was given during the January. Seasons and bag limits for most migratory gamebirds will be similar to 2017-18.

Proposed changes include the increase of the daily bag limit for pintails and black ducks from one bird a day to two birds a day.

Another proposed change is in regard to the youth waterfowl hunts which occur on consecutive Saturdays in February. The hunts have been for youth ages 6 to 15, but the agency is proposing a change for youth from ages 6 to 16 to fall in line with other TWRA youth hunts such as deer and turkey. Federal regulations were recently changed to include youth to age 16.

The proposal includes an expansion for most goose seasons to include more days. The bag limit of white-fronted geese would increase from two birds a day to three a day.

The statewide sandhill crane hunting season will remain the same with only a change in calendar dates.

In addition, the commission will discuss the possibility of applying Tennessee’s restrictions on the importation of deer, elk, moose, and caribou carcasses on all U.S. states and Canadian provinces, rather than just those that have confirmed cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD).

Contagious and deadly to members of the deer family known as cervids, this disease has been discovered in 25 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. Mississippi became the latest state to confirm CWD last week.

Many hunters travel out of state and often return with harvested animals. Import restrictions require that cervid carcasses be properly cleaned and dressed before being transported into Tennessee.

Lt. Col. Cape Taylor, Boating and Law Enforcement Assistant Chief, will discuss issues with CWD and provide and update on equipment needed to help with law enforcement issues concerning CWD. Capt. Matt Major will have a presentation on the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) that TWRA has used often in recovery efforts after fatal boating or drowning accidents.

TFWC Chairman Jamie Woodson will call for a report from the TFWC Officer Nominating Committee. The TFWC officers include a chairman, vice-chairman, and secretary.


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