Philanthropy Camp And Camp Tikkun Olam Taking Registrations

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Philanthropy Camp is a weeklong day camp designed to teach children the importance of giving back to their community. Through hands on activities, community speakers and field trips, the campers gain a "one-of-a-kind experience and the desire to serve our greater community."

Each day of camp has a theme, focusing on different aspects in the community. On “Environment Day,” the campers go on a field trip to a local park, farm or nature center to learn about taking care of their surroundings. On “Community and Elderly Day,” the campers enjoy scavenger hunts, games and songs with members at a local assisted living home. Other themed days have included “Acting Compassionately,” “Healthy Neighborhoods,” and “Out Into the World.” 

Will Potts, 2018 lead counselor who has helped with Philanthropy Camp in the past, says, “Philanthropy Camp is an amazing program because it sparks an interest to create strong, healthy and happy communities. I wanted to be a part of this in a leadership position because I want to help these kids grow up to be leaders who have a heart for our community.’’

Now in its 10th year, Philanthropy Camp was originally started for rising first-sixth graders. When campers began to “graduate” from Philanthropy Camp, officials said it seemed natural to start another camp for rising seventh-ninth graders, called Camp Tikkun Olam. “Tikkun Olam” means “repairing the world” in Hebrew, which they said falls perfectly in line with Philanthropy Camp’s goals. In this program, the campers travel to as many as eight nonprofit organizations throughout the week, focusing on issues such as homelessness, social services and the environment.

"While Philanthropy Camp inspires and teaches the importance of giving back, Camp Tikkun Olam implements these ideas, providing opportunities for social action and developing community leadership skills," officials said.

The camps run concurrently and take place from Monday, July 23 through Friday, July 27 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., with early drop-off starting at 8:30 a.m. and late pick-up until 4:30 p.m. The cost for camp is $130 per camper and $110 for each additional sibling. A limited number of scholarships are available. 

Philanthropy Camp and Camp Tikkun Olam are joint programs of Chattanooga First Church of the Nazarene and the Jewish Federation of Greater Chattanooga, with special thanks to B’nai Zion Congregation, Mizpah Congregation and other faith organizations, officials said. These camps are open to all children regardless of religious affiliation. 

For more information or to register for camp, contact the Jewish Federation at 423- 493-0270, camp@jewishchattanooga.com or visit www.jewishchattanooga.com and press the Camp drop down box for an application.


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